Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

22

You are combining the images in the form Show[Graphics[simplePrimitives], complicatedRegionPlot] The options in the resulting figure are inherited from the first term, namely Graphics[simplePrimitives]. This does not include the "TransparentPolygonMesh" -> True generated by RegionPlot. You see the mesh as a result. If you combine things as follows: ...


13

You could use the (undocumented) option Method -> {"TransparentPolygonMesh" -> True} for this, e.g. Show[Graphics[Point[{p1, p2}]], RegionPlot[{d[{x, y}, p1, M1] < d[{x, y}, p2, M2], d[{x, y}, p1, M1] > d[{x, y}, p2, M2]}, {x, -4, 4}, {y, -4, 4}], Method -> {"TransparentPolygonMesh" -> True}] which produce


13

RegionPlot[{d[{x, y}, p1, M1] < d[{x, y}, p2, M2], d[{x, y}, p1, M1] > d[{x, y}, p2, M2]}, {x, -4, 4}, {y, -4, 4}, Epilog -> Point[{p1, p2}]] seems to do what you want:


12

The answer, in this case, is updating the CUDA driver manually. Finding the driver, though, is non-trivial. For instance, this page says that there are no drivers available for the mac. To find the CUDA drivers, you need to find the Developer Zone, and go to the CUDA downloads page. Interestingly enough, the Getting Started Documentation (pdf) is Windows ...


12

The airport utility on your mac (which is not very widely known) gives you programmatic access to all your wireless information. I wrote a fun answer on Ask Different using this command line utility. To get the information about wireless devices around you, use the -s flag. Here's a simple function to automate it: getSSID[] := With[{data = ...


11

You can use the global AutoOpenNotebooks setting to give a list of notebooks that must be opened on startup. The default path where it looks for these notebooks is $UserBasedirectory/SystemFiles/FrontEnd/TextResources. Now every time you open Mathematica, that notebook will be opened (in my case, tile.nb).


11

Yes, the Mathematica application on Mac OS contains a few external binaries, which are mostly used for importing and exporting. These files have suffix .exe: $ find "/Applications/Mathematica 8.app" -name '*.exe'|wc -l 49 But even though .exe is a prefix common for Windows executables, it doesn’t mean that it can’t be used for other things. In fact, Mac OS ...


10

As explained in the section tutorial/CitationManagement you need to have EndNote or BibTeX for managing your citations. Interaction with both is covered in this tutorial. Below is the result I obtained using the sample BiBTeX file downloaded here. Don't forget to work in a cell with the Text style (Alt-7 on Windows) when you use this, otherwise the ...


9

On Mac OS 10.7 just holding down the Option key while you drag works.


9

I don't think the answer is related to choosing $OperatingSystem or SystemInformation as in Mr.Wizard's and F'x's answers (although both are cleaner than using $Version). I'm guessing you created your file on your PC and then opened it in your Mac. Tooltip then shows you the cached result from your PC. To make the tooltip refresh on your other machines, ...


9

The answer is that yes, you can affect the appearance of components of a control but the problem in this case is that your list of appearances appearances = {"DialogBox", "Palette", "FramedPalette", "Frameless"}; are only valid Button appearances and that is why they have no effect of ButtonBar or TabView. When you use valid appearances it works fine: ...


7

On OS X, it's called MathKernel and not mathematica or math. This file is located in the directory given by: FileNameJoin[{$InstallationDirectory, "Contents", "MacOS"}] You can see a partial list of files in that directory: FileNames["Math*", FileNameJoin[{$InstallationDirectory, "Contents", "MacOS"}]] (* { "/Applications/Mathematica ...


7

You can use the Style setting ControlRendering to display controls in their generic form: Rotate[Style[Button["Toto", Null], ControlsRendering -> "Generic"], 0] If you don't see the bottom line you need to set the Buttons ImageMargins: Rotate[Style[Button["Toto", Null, ImageMargins -> 1], ControlsRendering -> "Generic"], 0.0]


7

This issue seems to affect all PDFKit based viewers on OS X, but it doesn't appear to point to anything intrinsically wrong with Mathematica's PDF export. A work-around that allows you to view the exported PDF without color bands in PDFKit viewers such as Preview would be to use the following command when creating the PDF in Mathematica: Export["py.pdf", ...


7

What I do is the following. Save the following code as a text file in a permanent location under the name MathematicaLauncher.scpt: tell application "System Events" try get process "Mathematica" on error -- Not running, launch and run launch application "Mathematica" -- May need to wait until application finishes launching ...


7

You can always create your own custom controls. This is a lot of work, but it also gives you unlimited flexibility. You can even create completely new kinds of control. Scroll down to the last section here to see an example. If you're aiming for a custom TabView-like control, I'd start with PaneSelector. Here's a primitive example (just a start, not ...


7

If you are familiar with AppleScript, you could try an approach like this: (* from http://github.com/fmeinberg/AppleScript *) AppleScript["RunFile", file_] := Run["osascript " <> file] AppleScript["RunScript", script_] := Block[{file = ToFileName[$TemporaryDirectory, "script.txt"]}, Export[file, script, "String"]; AppleScript["RunFile", file]] ...


7

Basically, I came to the same conclusions as user6629 and Szabolcs. This means there are two solutions for the commandline. Specify -lstdc++.6 which is very weird, because on my machine libstdc++.dylib is just a link to libstdc++.6.dylib too. I traced the linker output and it really uses the correct library from /usr/lib which gives me some headache. Use ...


7

Let's put the answers together: Version 9.0.1 is compatible (acl, halirutan) Version 8.0.4 seems compatible too (bill s, Szabolcs)


6

I've had this issue for a long time and the only change that "fixed" it is to block all incoming connections. Go to System Preferences > Personal > Security & Privacy > Firewall Options and select Block all incoming connections as shown (you will have to unlock and enter your administrator password): A less drastic, but possibly riskier ...


6

If you are using OS X the use undocumented Method -> {"TransparentPolygonMesh" -> True}


6

This isn't exactly an answer, but more of an observation. I'm running V.9.0.1 on OS X 10.6.8. When I try to work with your functions f1P and f2P, I experience behavior that is somewhat different from the behavior you describe, but certainly not any more pleasant. With a fresh kernel I can evaluate either function definition without any apparent problem. ...


6

[ UPDATE 9/17/2014: I can confirm this problem is fixed in v10.0.1.0 ] WRI has confirmed this as: "a known issue between Mathematica and the new 2013 Macbook". And says they are working on fixing it for the next major release. FYI I'm running 2013 macbook w/ the discrete Nvidia card, & max memory, if that helps anyone who is trying to match my system. ...


6

To open the help page just place the cursor somewhere within the function name and press F1. To get the template list use the following shortcut Ctrl+Shift+k. More keyboard shortcuts can be found here.


5

How about using $OperatingSystem? Typical values for $OperatingSystem are "Windows", "MacOSX" and "Unix". $OperatingSystem "Windows"


5

The main part of this question has been answered at How to abort on any message generated? However, in my mind there remains a very live issue: why should the front end ever crash at all? Its primary job is as a user interface. As such, there is no excuse for it to crash, ever. By contrast, when I use a terminal program to connect with, say, a Linux ...


5

This is a Mac-only issue and it's present in earlier versions too (not just 9), though with rectangles it manifests itself less commonly in v8 than in v9. To solve the problem, use the option Method -> {"TransparentPolygonMesh" -> True} in Graphics to get rid of this problem. It will also disable antialiasing. Posts with the same problem, appearing ...


5

Try this: img = Image@ImageData@Import["http://i.stack.imgur.com/xKudh.png"]; Manipulate[img, {p, Locator}, SaveDefinitions -> True] or this img = Import["http://i.stack.imgur.com/xKudh.png"]; Manipulate[ img = Quiet[img /. ColorProfileData[] -> Automatic], {p, Locator}, SaveDefinitions -> True] I think the problem is how the image is ...


5

Try like this in a fresh kernel: Needs["RLink`"] SetEnvironment["DYLD_LIBRARY_PATH" -> "/Library/Frameworks/R.framework/Resources/lib"]; InstallR["RHomeLocation" -> "/Library/Frameworks/R.framework/Resources"]; Update: With Mathematica 10.0.1 (but not 10.0.0), use InstallR["RHomeLocation" -> "/Library/Frameworks/R.framework/Resources", ...


5

I propose two possible solutions: Turn off transparency by including Opacity[1] in the CountourStyle Use CapForm["Butt"] to prevent the line caps from overlapping. With this solution you can keep transparency on, and the result will look like: With CapForm["Butt"] theoretically there can still be a slight misalignment, or crack between the lines, but ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible