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1

I agree that CurrentValue should work, here is a work around: ( SelectionMove[#, All, Cell]; FrontEndTokenExecute[EvaluationNotebook[], "Style", "Title"] ) & /@ Cells[CellStyle -> "Section"]


1

Using NotebookWrite in this manner is really no different from manually modifying the content of an Output cell. The FrontEnd converts the cell to Input, since it anticipates the user would be interested in evaluating it afterwards. What style is used is determined by DefaultDuplicateCellStyle.


1

I have a possible work around here: Button["date", NotebookWrite[EvaluationCell[], Cell[#, "Output"] &@BoxData@ToBoxes@DateString[]]; SelectionMove[EvaluationNotebook[], Previous, Cell]; CurrentValue[Cells[NotebookSelection[EvaluationNotebook[]]][[1]], StyleNames] = "Subsection"] unforunately i could not test EvaluationBox[] because i have only ...


3

You can try SelectionMovelike this: SelectionMove[nb, Next, CellGroup] or SelectionMove[nb, All, CellGroup] one of these should work in your case EDIT: Full Solution for an arbitrary notebook: nb = CreateWindow[ DocumentNotebook[{CellGroup[{TextCell["Text Group", "Section"], TextCell["Mary had a little lamb.", "Text"], TextCell["Its fleece ...


1

SelectionMove works on CellObjects just like on NotebookObjects: SelectionMove[Cells[nb][[1]], All, Cell]


3

a = 108 b::usage = "test usage msg" b[x_] := 4 x + 8 c = Interpolation[{15, 16, 23, 42}] As pointed by OP, the direct usage of FullDefinition produces boxes that are not realy useful. I don't know how to convert them easily without this tiny undocumented function [1], [2]: Save["test.m", {a, b, c}] CreateDocument @ Cell[#, "Input"] &@ First @ ...


2

It seems there is something you need. Undocumented so who knows. MathLink`CallFrontEnd[ FrontEnd`NotebookImage[ EvaluationNotebook[] ] ]


0

On can also use the menu bar. Go to Edit ▶ Preferences... and under the Interface tab one can uncheck "Enable floating elements ..." Alternatively, one can increase the delay to a number that is big enough to prevent an unwanted pop up.


0

The popup window you are talking about is removed by the ShowCodeAssist option set to false. The other settings don't concern your problem.


0

From what I've read here on MSE, it is not possible to create a default WindowSize for new notebooks. To cope with this efficiently, I've created the following palette which others might find handy as well. The result looks like this: And the full code is: (* Screen sizing buttons *) fullscreen = Button[Text[Style["Full Screen", Small, FontFamily ...


0

I have found using stylesheets allows you to have tabs to open and close at will. So, if you close the tab with all your code in it, the notebook will compile and the tabs with code will still remain closed. Hope I answered the question.


5

On Windows this works for me: Pause[1]; 1 + 1 (*you can add Save or Export here ofc*) NotebookSave @ EvaluationNotebook[]; Run["shutdown -t 2 -s"]; NotebookClose[] For command explanation take a look at the link Öskå has provided: SO:162305


0

Thanks for the tip, @bbgodfrey. I dug into the online docs for Workbench, and see that it does in fact offer precisely the kind of functionality and information I was hoping for.



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