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12

Very often, especially new Mathematica users stumble over the following error: They gave, maybe hours ago, a symbol a value like x=3, and later they try to use it where a function really expects a symbol: This leads of course to an error, because the Minimize call does not see the x, but only its value. The same happens when you try to derive this ...


8

This is not necessarily an answer, but the Mathematica system is very flexible and I think you might be able to accomplish what you're after with Mathematica itself. Look at this code here: nbWindow = Null; nb = Notebook[{}]; OPEN[] := Module[{}, nbWindow = NotebookCreate[Visible -> False]; nbWindow = NotebookPut[nb]; SetOptions[nbWindow, ...


8

That's a good question, though perhaps difficult to answer. The input aliases for these letters are stored not in the InputAliases option of the $FrontEnd object but rather in the UnicodeCharacters.tr file. Surely they are loaded into the Front End but I do not know the location of that data, and as such I cannot think of a clean way to access that ...


3

To include a backslash in a string, you need to escape it, like so: "\\[" <> name <> "]"


3

Here's a function that might help: Clear[escapify]; Attributes[escapify] = {Listable}; escapify[s_String] := NotebookWrite[SelectedNotebook[], StringJoin[ "\\" <> "[AliasDelimiter]" <> # <> "\\" <> "[AliasDelimiter]" & /@ Characters[s]]]; This takes each character in a string (or list of strings) and puts it into a new ...


1

As the comments to OP described, those invisible marks are usually used as placeholder / anchor for typesetting. For example, we can use \[InvisiblePostfixScriptBase] to emulate the spaces and alignments in some tensor notions. In LaTeX it's usually done by the \phantom command: Compare RowBox[{SubscriptBox["F", ...



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