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I am not quite sure that understood you. Your data, for example, only contains the figures 32 and 38 taken in a random order. Here are 10 of them: data = RandomChoice[{32, 38}, 10] (* {32, 32, 32, 38, 32, 32, 38, 38, 32, 38} *) According to the description your microscopic data should be more close to the following (again there are only 25 figures ...


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Instead of PlotRange->{{0,x},Automatic} to display your data from 0 till $x$, you can use PlotRange->{{All,x},All} or PlotRange->{{Automatic,x},All}. The plot then includes the ticks and labels on the $y$-axis, and the PlotRange All ensures that it extends sufficiently high, as in this example: mydata = RandomVariate[ExponentialDistribution[1], ...


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synthetic data: strings = DateString /@ Sort@RandomVariate[ NormalDistribution[AbsoluteTime[Date[]], 10^7],200]; Note this date string format is not exactly the same as yours but I think all this will still work. DateListPlot[MapIndexed[ {#, First@#2} &, strings ], Ticks -> {DateRange[{2013, 12}, {2016, 2}, {{3, "Month"}}], ...


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Does something like this help? A = {1.0, 2.3, 1.5, 3.0, 1.1}; B = {2, 10, 3, 1, 0} ; minB = 1; maxB = 3; Histogram[Pick[A, minB <= # <= maxB & /@ B], 2] UPDATE: This part does the filtering: filteredA = Pick[A, minB <= # <= maxB & /@ B] I assumed the binning was straightforward and didn't try to make it pretty. Here's a better ...


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New answer using BinLists A = {1.0, 2.3, 1.5, 3.0, 1.1}; B = {2, 10, 3, 1, 0}; nbins = 2; AIdx = Transpose[{A, Range[Length[A]]}]; (* AIdx contains {{{1., 1}, {1.5, 3}, {1.1, 5}}, {{2.3, 2}, {3., 4}}} corresponding to {{A[[1]],A[[3]],A[[5]]}, {A[[2]],A[[4]]}} as value/index pairs *) {minA, maxA} = {Min[A], Max[A]}; {minB, maxB} = {1, 3}; firstHistIndexed ...



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