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24

If you can put your schedule into a list like this: schedule = { {"Lundi", "09:30", 1, "Inorg 1", "N-515", Lighter[Orange, 0.5]}, {"Lundi", "10:30", 1, "Physique 4", "N-515", Lighter[Cyan, 0.5]}, {"Mardi", "9:30", 2, "Macromol 2", "G-815", Lighter[Green, 0.3]}, {"Mardi", "14:30", 1, "Inorg 1", "répet N-515", Lighter[Orange, 0.5]}, ...


21

You can also use the HorizontalGauge function introduced in version 9. For example: bar = HorizontalGauge[#, {0, 100}, GaugeMarkers -> "ScaleRange", GaugeStyle -> {Darker@Green, GrayLevel[0.95]}, TicksStyle -> None, GaugeFrameSize -> None, ScalePadding -> 0, ImageSize -> 200, AspectRatio -> 1/5, LabelStyle -> None, ...


21

I liked rm-rf's gauged solution so much that I made an interactive version: bar[n_] := DynamicModule[{x = n}, HorizontalGauge[Dynamic[x], {0, 100}, GaugeMarkers -> "ScaleRange", GaugeStyle -> {Darker@Green, GrayLevel[0.95]}, TicksStyle -> None, GaugeFrameSize -> None, ScalePadding -> 0, ImageSize -> 200, AspectRatio -> 1/5, ...


17

GraphicsRow takes a PlotLabel option: p1 = Plot[Sin[x], {x, 0, Pi}, PlotLabel -> Sin]; p2 = Plot[Cos[x], {x, 0, Pi}, PlotLabel -> Cos]; GraphicsRow[{p1, p2}, PlotLabel -> "Two plots"]


16

How about this? Grid[{{1, 2, 3}, {4, Item[5, Frame -> {{True, True}, {True, False}}], 6}}]


16

Something like this? Grid[Map[Graphics[{GrayLevel[0.8], Rectangle[Scaled[{0, 0}], Scaled[{#, 1}]], Black, Style[Text[#], Large]}, AspectRatio -> 0.2] &, RandomReal[{0, 1}, {4, 3}], {2}], Frame -> All] Of course you can place the Text and style to taste. Here is a slightly more complex version: Grid[Map[Graphics[{GrayLevel[0.8], ...


15

Here's my go at it. This tells you if two line segments intersect (unless they lie on the same line, in which case it fails horribly): ClearAll[segmentsIntersect]; segmentsIntersect[{a_, b_}, {p_, q_}] := Module[{s, t, soln}, soln = NSolve[a + t (b - a) == p + s (q - p), {s, t}]; If[Length@soln == 0, False, (0 <= s <= 1 && 0 <= t ...


12

This is my implementation using Graphics primitives and rules. Here's the final result; the implementation details and edge cases follow. 1. General approach First, we start with a single square and build up a test grid: square = Polygon[{{0, 0}, {1, 0}, {1, 1}, {0, 1}}]; grid = Graphics[{EdgeForm[Black], FaceForm[None], Table[Transpose@First@square ...


11

While drag'n'drop isn't officially supported in Mathematica currently (Depending on your definition of support), I believe Wolfram is working on it for a future version, or at least more direct support. I can't remember which screencast, but something was mentioned about this in one of Steven Wolframs talks posted on the official Mathematica blog. Now to ...


10

The Pane construct is quite flexible. I cannot imagine not using it with table for fluid sizes control and features. Here are your data: data={{"000000000\n111111111\n222222222","000000000"},{"000000000","000000000"}} This will fix the cell size and cut off the content if it won't fit: Grid[Map[Pane[#, ImageSize -> {80, 30}] &, data, {2}], Frame ...


9

Programmatically I would use: img = ExampleData[{"TestImage", "Lena"}]; Image[img, Magnification -> 1] Manually you can right-click on the image and select Actual Size. Within an Image there is raster data of a particular dimension: Dimensions @ ImageData @ img {512, 512, 3} This is a 512 x 512 pixel image with three channels. Additionally ...


9

You should investigate in the Scaled function: lots = GraphicsGrid[ Table[With[{a = RandomInteger[{1, 17}], b = RandomInteger[{1, 17}]}, ParametricPlot[Sin[t^2] {Cos[a t], Sin[b t]}, {t, 0, 2 \[Pi]}, PlotRange -> {{-1, 1}, {-1, 1}}, Frame -> True, ImageSize -> Scaled[1]]], {15}, {7}]]; Export["lots.pdf", lots]


9

Here is an ILP approach. It can be modified to alter requirements e.g. if a course has a lab, must take neither or both, maybe insist on at most one instructor with the lowest rating, at most two classes before 9 AM, have courses that meet on multiple days, etc. I entered it all by hand although clearly one could use Import and further processing. courses ...


8

Depending on what you are doing, this might be better solved by using Graphics commands and building the display as a graphics object rather than a textural output. This however does the trick with just inserting elements into the grid shape: gridDots[a_] := Module[{ rowspacing = Riffle[#, " ", {1, 1 + Last@Dimensions[a] 2, 2}] &, colspacing = ...


8

Possibly more versatile, but you have to mess with text overlapping your plots, but GraphicsRow also accepts Epilog GraphicsRow[{Plot[Sin[x], {x, 0, 4 Pi}], Plot[Cos[x], {x, 0, 4 Pi}]}, Spacings -> Scaled[0.4], Epilog -> Inset["Plot Title", Scaled[{0.5, 0.95}]]]


8

You can do : p = ImplicitRegion[y <= 3/10 x + 18 && y > x^2/8, {x, y}] points = Reduce[Element[{x, y}, p], {x, y}, Integers] pp = Cases[points, x == xx_ && y == yy_ -> {xx, yy}] pp // Length (* 286 *) Show[RegionPlot[p], ListPlot[pp]]


7

Slightly less dirty: d = 10; t = Table[x, {d}, {d}]; Grid[MapAt[Item[#, Frame -> White] &, t, Tuples[{Range@d, {-2, -1}}]], Dividers -> {#, #} &@Thread[(# -> Black &)[Range[3, d, 2]]]]


7

When I need more interface control, I usually do something like this: p1=Plot[Sin[x],{x,0,Pi},PlotLabel->Sin,ImageSize->150]; p2=Plot[Cos[x],{x,0,Pi},PlotLabel->Cos,ImageSize->150]; title=Panel[Style["Test Label",White,20],ImageSize->300,Background->Orange,Alignment->Center]; ...


7

You could use TableForm, e.g. col = CharacterRange["A", "E"]; row = CharacterRange["a", "e"]; TableForm[m, TableHeadings -> {row, col}] A way using Grid: Grid[{PadLeft[col, 6, ""]}~Join~ MapThread[PadLeft[#1, 6, #2] &, {m, row}], Dividers -> {{False, True, {False}}, {False, True, {False}}}]


7

Perhaps what you want: m = Array[Subtract, {5, 5}, 0]; r = Range @ 5; Grid[ ArrayFlatten[{{"", {r}}, {{r}\[Transpose], m}}], Frame -> All ]


7

I can reproduce the problem described by OP in Mathematica 9.0.1 on Windows 8.1. By using FrontEnd`UndocumentedBoxInformationPacket to check the displayed Boxes' layout in the FrontEnd, I wildly guess that the cause of the problem might be hiding in the FrontEnd layout engine (of only the Windows version maybe?). If it's true, then there might be nothing we ...


7

eqn = y <= 3/10 x + 18 && y > x^2/8; sol = Reduce[eqn, {x, y}, Integers]; Length @ sol (* 286 *) points = {x, y} /. {ToRules[sol]}; (* thanks: BobHanlon *) RegionPlot[eqn, {x, -15, 18}, {y, -5, 25}, GridLines -> {Range[-15, 18], Range[-5, 25]}, PlotStyle -> Directive[{Opacity[0.5], Red}], Epilog -> ...


7

Here is another solution using V10 functionalities: region = ImplicitRegion[y <= 3/10 x + 18 && y > x^2/8, {{x, -15, 18}, {y, -5, 25}}]; lis = Tuples[{Range[-15, 18], Range[-5, 25]}]; We create a RegionMemberFunction rm = RegionMember[region]; Now we select from lis the points that are in the region: in = Select[lis, rm]; Length @ in ...


6

Maybe using sub-grids in the second column will more be like what you want. I tried it out and got something that was close to the TableForm layout. color = RGBColor[0., .5, 1.]; dots = Graphics[{color, Disk[]}, ImageSize -> #] & /@ {40, 60, 50, 60, 40}; data = {{"Angel Falls", "17.7 m", "0.82", "9.2"}, {"Bridalveil Fall", "6.9 m", "0.94", ...


6

If you select your output cell (by the bracket on the right), it can be converted to bitmap via the Cell $\rightarrow$ Convert To $\rightarrow$ Bitmap menu option. For programmatic conversion: If you prefer bitmaps, you can rasterize your table: table = TableForm[{{5, 7}, {4, 2}, {10, 3}}, TableHeadings -> {{"A", "B", "C"}, {"1", "2"}}]; ...


6

DynamicModule[{n = 3, prefTable = ConstantArray[0, {3, 20, 7}], lastName = ConstantArray["", {3}], firstName = ConstantArray["", {3}], ws = ConstantArray[0, {3}], wsAmount = ConstantArray[Null, {3}], wkndPref = ConstantArray[Null, {3}], tabLabel = Array["Worker " <> ToString[#] &, {3}], hours = DateString[DatePlus[{2012, 1, 1, 7, ...


6

Grid[tab, Frame -> {None, None, {{1, 1} -> True, {1, 2} -> True}}, ItemSize -> All]


6

Why this happens? The reason for this behaviour is that Mathematica works with two kinds of units: plot coordinates---the same thing you see on the axes offset coordinates---these are in printer's points Plot coordinates scale with the figure: if you print the figure (or export to PDF) at twice the size, objects specified on plot coordinates double in ...


6

I guess: i = ExampleData[{"TestImage", "Lena"}]; Image[#, ImageSize -> ImageDimensions[#]] &@i will do.


6

Maybe evenrows = Prepend[#, " "] & /@ (Join @@ Thread[{#, " "}] & /@ a); oddrows = (Join @@ ConstantArray[{"\[CenterDot]", " "}, 8]); Grid@Riffle[evenrows, {oddrows}, {1, -1, 2}] ?



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