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You can use all of Three‚ÄźDimensional Graphics Primitives like so; a = {1, 1, 1}; b = {1, -1, 2}; Graphics3D[{Red, Arrow[{a, b}]}, Axes -> True, Boxed -> True, AxesLabel -> {x, y, z}] If useful, WA also can process this information, check the parametric info; And there is a verry nice Reference on this Site: Plot points, line and plane in ...


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To expand on Nikie's comment... Graphics3D[Arrow[{{1, 1, 1}, {1, -1, 2}}], Axes -> True, AxesLabel -> {"X", "Y", "Z"}, ImageSize -> Large] Arrow is a symbolic graphics primitive. Graphics3D is a function to draw graphics primitives.


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Working with GraphicsComplex retains a degree of flexibility. For instance, Graphics3D[GraphicsComplex[p[[1, 1]], Line[Rest@Cases[p, Line[z__] :> z, Infinity]]]] gives the Mesh in 3D. (Rest@ deletes the perimeter of the surface.) If, instead, a plot of the points in 3D is desired, use Graphics3D[GraphicsComplex[p[[1, 1]], ...


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Expanding @Guess comment: p1 = Join @@ Cases[Normal@p, Line[x1__] :> x1, Infinity]; ListPlot[Most /@ p1] p1 = Join @@ Cases[Normal@p, Line[x1__] :> {RGBColor @@ RandomReal[{0, 1}, 3], Line[Most /@ x1]}, Infinity]; Graphics[p1, AspectRatio -> 1/GoldenRatio]



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