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8

There is an undocumented file in the installation directory named specialArgFunctions.tr: NotebookOpen @ FileNameJoin @ { $InstallationDirectory, "SystemFiles", "FrontEnd", "SystemResources" , "FunctionalFrequency", "specialArgFunctions.tr" } This file describes in detail how to attach completion actions to each parameter of listed functions. For ...


7

It turned out that the MathematicaClosingDialog.nb is a nice example for a graphical user interface that solely uses the FrontEnd MathKernel. On the downside, one has to deal with low-level code. First I made a copy of the original MathematicaClosingDialog.nb, renamed it as MathematicaClosingDialog_Default.nb, and then imported it into a notebook: nb = ...


7

This is a very common problem for people who work on data analysis. Here as a solution to the problem using LocatorPane and a few other functions and tricks. TooltipListPlot[data_, tipFunction_, listPlotOptions___] := DynamicModule[ {displayQ = False, yRange , xRange, pt, minX, maxX, minY, maxY, tip, threshold, tipPosition, nf, dataPoints, ...


6

To make multiple tables, you should create a style definition for it. The style definitions used in tutorials can be found in the file FileNameJoin[{$InstallationDirectory, "SystemFiles", "FrontEnd", "StyleSheets", "Wolfram", "Reference.nb"}] (Execute it on your machine to find the local file name.) The style you show is called "DefinitionBox3Col". ...


5

The option GraphicsBoxOptions -> {ImageSize -> 500} can be set for the plot in several ways. (The option PreserveImageOptions is the one that controls what happens when the output cell is replaced. By default, the current size in output cell is preserved.) Stylesheet One can create a new style, say, "LargeImageSize" by editing the stylesheet (menu ...


5

In the meantime, here is a way to repair the gridlines fixGridLines[plot : _Graphics | _Legended] := Module[{xmin, xmax, ymin, ymax}, {{xmin, xmax}, {ymin, ymax}} = Through[{Min, Max}[#]] & /@ Transpose@Cases[plot, {_Real, _Real}, Infinity]; With[{p = plot}, MakeBoxes[p, StandardForm]] /. pat : (GridLines -> ...


5

Try something like text = { {Style[" option name", Italic], Style["default value", Italic], ""}, {" BackSubstitution", "False", "whether the solutions \ngiven by Reduce..."}, {" Cubics", "False", "whether the...\n"}}; Column[{ Grid[text, Alignment -> Left, Background -> RGBColor[0.92, 0.88, 0.84], Dividers -> {None, {1 ...


4

Context Menu The content of context menus is defined in the ContextMenus.tr in the $InstallationDirectory\SystemFiles\FrontEnd\TextResources folder. It is possible to modify this file within an editor (e.g. Notepad++). In order to get a new context menu item with the functionality you described: First make a backup copy of the original ContextMenus.tr, ...


4

This answer, which is a slight modification of my answer to a previous question, takes you most of the way there: Clear@notebookScreenshot notebookScreenshot[nb_] := Module[{left, top, size, opts = AbsoluteOptions@nb}, {left, top} = WindowMargins /. opts // Diagonal; size = WindowSize /. opts; Needs["GUIKit`"]; ...


3

You can change the Mathematica menu in the way you desire by editing the MenuSetup.tr file, and restarting Mathematica. I make this change each time I get a new version of Mathematica. Of course, this isn't ideal, because it involves making a permanent change to the system, but it does work - just follow the style of the rest of the file. Be careful to ...


2

Mathematica uses the voice set in System Preferences for it's built-in speech functions. It determines that voice when it is launched, so to get it to recognize a new voice preference you have quit and relaunch.


1

Under Windows, you select an expression then right-click on it and choose the Speak selection menu item from the contextual menu. The voice used is the one set in the system preferences. Using Speak or SpokenString give you some options, but they do not seem to relate to the Speak Selection Menu Item mentioned above.


1

This isn't exactly a screenshot but maybe it meets your needs? doc = CreateDocument[{ TextCell["Need help", "Section"], Cell[1/0], TextCell["Can you help?"]}, WindowTitle -> "MyNotebook"]; Rasterize@doc


1

I classify your question as "Serious" thus, here is my answer. In many cases I have found myself in situations where a "canonical solution" does not seem to exist for a given problem found while creating Mathematica solutions. In those cases I tend to create a reasonable enough solution. When I read your question I remembered that a couple of years ago I ...



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