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5

The command Run will do exactly that. For example, try Run["touch ~/Desktop/blankfile"] If you want to read the results back in, there are a few options, and the choice between them depends on exactly what you want to do. The RunThrough command lets you read the output of a command-line back as a Mathematica expression. For example, try ...


4

I don't know any neat answer but here's one that works for me at the moment. How we can detect Help, Text, Package type notebooks: "DocumentType" /. NotebookInformation /@ Notebooks[] {"Notebook", "Notebook", "Notebook", "Help", "Package", "Text", "Notebook", "Notebook", "Notebook", "Notebook"} Message is the only one with no external ...


4

I think the most straight forward would be to use Mathematica packages and importing the definitions in that notebook using the function Get as Szabolcs mentioned in the comments. I suggest that you have a closer look at the documentation on how to set up packages in Mathematica. Th principle is quite simple to understand. Here is a small example of how ...


4

I don't think there is any shortcut for that. But we can always construct one by scanning the CellChangeTimes of all the cells and picking out the latest one. Here is a quick solution: Button[ "Find me\nthe last edit!", {#, CurrentValue[#, CellChangeTimes]} & /@ Cells[SelectedNotebook[], CellStyle -> {"Input"}] // ...


4

I think the information given by AbsoluteOptions will be enough to distinguish one type of Notebook from another. To investigate the differences among the option values of different Notebooks, we first prepare all six types of Notebooks: nblist = Complement[Notebooks[], {EvaluationNotebook[]}] Then we extract all of their AbsoluteOptions, and delete ...


3

Palettes have a specific window frame, so: DeleteCases[Notebooks[], x_ /; MemberQ[Options[x], WindowFrame -> "Palette"]] The Help seems to have a specific docked cell, so: DeleteCases[Notebooks[], x_ /; MemberQ[Options[x], DockedCells -> FEPrivate`FrontEndResource["FEExpressions", "HelpViewerToolbar"]]] So you can combine these two: ...


1

Mathematica ships with it's own Qt libraries. Consider replacing them with the system libraries, then it probabily fits nicely into the Ubuntu layout. This guide will probabily also workk with newer Mathematica versions: http://homepage.uibk.ac.at/~c705283/archives/2010/03/29/mathematica_7_qt_style/index.html



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