Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

decibel is a relative unit. I'm pretty sure there is no implied standard reference in audio processing, (it looks like audiologists have a few go-to's e.g. dB HL, but I don't know what Audacity does). That said, you need a reference value. Since you're looking at FFT's the total power might be a good choice. Then decibels will tell you how strong a ...


0

Take your $y$ values (in a list myData) and convert them by the definition for decibels: 20 Log[10, #/Min[myData]] & /@ myData If your data is in the form of {{t1, v1}, {t2, v2}, ...} then in a simple (but inefficient) method: myData = {{3, 6}, {4, 8}, {5, 2}}; myMin = Min[myData[[All, 2]]]; fixedData = {#[[1]], 20 Log[10, #[[2]]/myMin]} & /@ ...


1

From the definition in R and testing: fac[n_, p_] := Or @@ (FactorInteger[n][[All, 1]] == # & /@ (Rest@Subsets[p])) nc[n_, p_] := NestWhile[# + 1 &, n, ! fac[#, p] &] Some R examples: and nc[#, {2, 3, 5}] & /@ {47, 100, 101, 1001, 10001} yields: {48, 100, 108, 1024, 10125} Similarly, nc[103, {3, 5, 7}] nc[1017, {7, 11, 13}] ...



Top 50 recent answers are included