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27

This problem is probably due to the MathematicaMono font which is introduced in v10. Defining the problem: Some fonts ("[","_","]","=", etc.) are rendered badly with strange thinning in v10 in some notebook magnifications. This is obvious when you compare the renderings from v10 with those from v9. Analyzing the problem: I found that all of these ...


20

Import text as a FilledCurve in graphics, using PDF as an intermediate format. Below are modified examples from Documentation Center: text = First[First[ImportString[ExportString[Style["Hi", Italic, FontSize -> 24, FontFamily -> "Times"], "PDF"], "PDF", "TextMode" -> "Outlines"]]]; Outline fonts using different edge and face forms: ...


18

I might as well post my comment to Szabolcs as an answer. As Szabolcs noted, the default screen resolution in Mathematica is set to 72 dpi which might not agree with the actual resolution. You can change the screen resolution in the Option Inspector which can be found in the Format menu. Set "Show option values" to "Global preferences" to change Front End ...


17

The relevant line from this SO post: fontlist = FE`Evaluate[FEPrivate`GetPopupList["MenuListFonts"]]; Update: The content of the "MenuListFonts" list is system-dependent. In Windows Vista, I get a list that contains only FontFamily: Panel@Row[fontlist[[;; 60]] /. Rule[x_, y_] :> Style[ToString@x, 14, FontFamily -> y], " \[FilledSquare] "] On ...


15

"Vectorizing" the font: curve = First[First[ ImportString[ExportString[ Style["{",FontFamily ->"Times",FontSize -> 72], "PDF"], "TextMode" -> "Outlines"]]]; cg = Graphics[curve] and then your code, replacing the Inset[] clause by Inset[Pane[cg, ImageSizeAction -> "ResizeToFit"], .... Result (scales OK when resizing the Plot): ...


14

There are a variety of ways to do this. One can use Stylesheets as noted by acl. Perhaps the most direct way is this: For one Notebook: SetOptions[EvaluationNotebook[], FontSize -> 16] For all Notebooks: SetOptions[$FrontEnd, FontSize -> 16] You can also set FontSize for different Box types, such as GraphicsBox: SetOptions[$FrontEnd, ...


13

The question I'll answer here is "How is the cell style of a given cell resolved." There are several other questions one could ask about option resolution, and I won't attempt to answer all of them here, but I will show in some exhaustive detail, at the cell level, what's happening. First, a parent set of options is calculated at the notebook level and ...


12

Mathematica will normally embed the fonts correctly in a PDF. But this only works if the font exists. Papyrus does not have a bold weight. Try with FontWeight->"Bold" deleted and see if this works. I don't have Papyrus on my Windows machine, but I checked that Kristen ITC does not embed if it is bold, and does if the FontWeight option is removed.


12

To make such labeling more user-friendly, I wrote this function (edited to add rotation): stretchText[char_, pos_, scale_, angle_: 0] := Module[{g, coords, xMin, xMax, yMin, yMax}, g = First@First@ImportString[ExportString[char, "PDF"], "TextOutlines" -> True]; coords = Apply[Join, Cases[g, FilledCurve[___, p_] :> Flatten[p, 1], ...


12

Font family, size, etc. depends on "Graphics" style in the notebook stylesheet CurrentValue[{StyleDefinitions, "Graphics", "FontSize"}] (* 10 *) CurrentValue[{StyleDefinitions, "Graphics", "FontFamily"}] (* "Times" *) You can manually change it: open Format->Edit Stylesheet..., add Cell[StyleData["Graphics"],FontSize->20] and press Ctrl+Shift+E. ...


11

Getting the names of the fonts is pretty easy. I like Heike's solution, but I can remember the following procedure better. Just format the text in some text cell with any font style you like and then enter the menu command Cell > Show Expression (ctrlshiftE on a PC) revealing the formatting instructions. Cell[TextData[StyleBox["aaaaa", ...


11

The "OperatorSubstitution" option does prevent the use of Mathematica fonts, but only for those cases where there were ASCII equivalents. So if your graphic contains expressions which use, for example, parentheses, brackets, braces, or various ASCII operators (plus, minus, asterisk, etc.), then the "OperatorSubstitution" is exactly what you want and you are ...


11

The Program style is purpose-built for this sort of thing: If you do not like the look of the bars above and below the cell, you can remove them by selecting the cell and changing the CellFrame option in the Option Inspector:


10

While this is not an answer, I did not want to add it as a comment. The issue is not specific to Linux, happens under Windows as well (Win7 in particular). Also, it is not specific to font: any monospaced font seems to produce overhangs to the default frame of $n$ characters. While rasterized characters have different image dimensions, as pointed out by ...


10

Arnoud Buzing in chat made us aware of this support page that discusses possibly related issues. UPDATE: A new version of the Windows installer has been placed on the Wolfram Portal. Its file hash is: F3EEC3AFEC3186001A1A237C88B7A991 You can check this with the following command: BaseForm[FileHash["Mathematica_9.0.0_WIN.exe", "MD5"], 16]


10

Mathematica automatically replaces many operators found in normal text fonts with operators in a Mathematica font. You can change that behavior as follows: SetOptions[EvaluationNotebook[], PrivateFontOptions -> {"OperatorSubstitution" -> False}] Test: ListPlot[Table[RandomReal[NormalDistribution[], {20, 2}], {2}], PlotStyle -> ...


10

Mathematica will only let you use fonts installed on the system. I have two suggestions here: At the top of your CDF file, display a link depending on the operating system, pointing to the correct file for downloading the font link = If[$OperatingSystem == "Linux" || $OperatingSystem == "Windows", Hyperlink["Download font for " <> ...


8

What Verbeia said in her answer is not entirely correct — Mathematica indeed does embed the font, regardless of whether a particular font weight/slant exists or not. The real culprits are the PDF viewers on Macs, which do not use the base font if the specified weight is not available. It took some digging around to get to the reason though. The clues that ...


8

An important issue in the question seems to be that of speed. So as Sjoerd suggested, I wrote a solution that pre-outlines all the characters in a reasonable range of ASCII characters, and then does the replacements on an arbitrary string. The characters are stored in a table ascii, and their graphic replacements in asciiGraphics. I then define the ...


8

Following from Mr. Wizard's post, I was able to get Mathematica to substitute Greek letters with whatever font I want by editing \SystemFiles\FrontEnd\TextResources\UnicodeFontMapping.tr. I first tried changing Mathematica: (Mathematica1 Mathematica1Mono) Automatic into Mathematica: (DejaVuSans DejaVuSansMono) Automatic which worked for changing the ...


7

I noticed that if I set the font size to 96/72 times larger, then I get precisely the same font sizes as in WordPad. (I used WordPad because Word has more advanced text handling and does not usually look the same as other Windows programs.) The screen resolution on my system seems to be 96 dpi, and Mathematica knows this: In[1]:= Options[$FrontEnd, ...


7

The simplest way would be to select x and y and press CmdI on a mac to make those letters italic before evaluating it (CtrlI on Windows/Linux). It will also appear italicized in your input cell. If you want to do it programmatically, you can use Row and Style the letters you want appropriately. Plot[Sin[x], {x, 0, 2 Pi}, PlotRange -> All, Frame -> ...


7

In my opinion you don't have many options here and honestly, I would not try to achieve this with Mathematica and Linux because the font-rendering was, is and will at least for some time be crappy. In the examples, I use the "Liberation Serif" which is the default serif font on my system. Let me give some ideas: The easiest thing I know is to use ...


7

In addition to AxesStyle etc. which can be set for specific functions such as Plot with e.g. SetOptions[Plot, ...] there are more global FrontEnd settings by Box type. These are accessible in the Option Inspector: From here we can set options that apply to multiple plot functions, and in fact all Graphics objects that do not override the defaults. You ...


7

Font for the Greek letters is defined in UnicodeFontMapping.tr: ... 0x03B1 N -2 0x61 # \[Alpha] 0x03B2 N -2 0x62 # \[Beta] 0x03B3 N -2 0x67 # \[Gamma] 0x03B4 N -2 0x64 # \[Delta] 0x03F5 N 2 0x65 # \[Epsilon] 0x03B5 N -4 0xb6 ...


6

You could do something like {Framed@Graphics[ Text[Style[DynamicWrapper["how quickly daft jumping zebras vex", p = CurrentValue["FontNWidth"]], FontFamily -> "Verdana", FontSize -> 20]], ImageSize -> Dynamic[p]*35], Dynamic[p]} This code demonstrates that the font chosen for the styled output is definitely being picked up by ...


6

You need to make a backup and then modify the UnicodeFontMapping.tr file: FileNameJoin[{$InstallationDirectory, "SystemFiles", "FrontEnd", "TextResources", "UnicodeFontMapping.tr"}] Look for the line 0xF3C8 N 6 0xad # \[Conjugate] and modify it to something like 0xF3C8 N 1 0x2a # * ...


6

To specify the style of inline formula, there is a style called "InlineCell". Add the following to the stylesheet would do it: Cell[StyleData["InlineCell"], LanguageCategory->"Formula", FontFamily->"Arial"] Or specify the "TraditionalForm" style as Rojo said to make sure the font used in inline formula is consistent with it used in stand alone ...


6

You can find calligraphic script under the Palettes' Special Characters menu. E.g. Plot[Sin[x], {x, 0, 6 Pi}, AxesLabel -> {\[ScriptCapitalT], None}] Or, if you specifically want the LaTeX Mathcal font - apparently cmbsy10 - you can download and install it, and specify it in the Style option:- Plot[Sin[x], {x, 0, 6 Pi}, AxesLabel -> {Style["T", ...


6

I analyzed which fonts are loaded when starting Mma v10 compared to v9. The problem could be tracked down to the loading of the fonts in the Folder $InstallationDirectory\SystemFiles\Fonts\TrueType If you open Mathematica-Bold.ttf or MathematicaMono-Bold.ttf, you will see how ugly these are. To prevent loading these fonts one should make a backup copy of ...



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