New answers tagged

1

Since this appears to still be broken under Mathematica 10.3 on Windows, consider the following workaround based on the solution provided by Verbeia: nb = EvaluationNotebook[]; SetOptions[ nb, StyleDefinitions -> Notebook[{Cell[StyleData[StyleDefinitions -> "Default.nb"]], Cell[StyleData["TraditionalForm"], PrivateFontOptions -> ...


3

In the same spirit of Sjoerd's answer, you can "steal" the theme-generated directives and replace them in the target plot. With a dummy plot created using the desired theme, dummyPlot = Plot[{1, 2, 3}, {x, 0, 1}, PlotTheme -> "Monochrome"] You can collect the generated directives, directives = Cases[dummyPlot, Directive[a__] :> List@a, ...


11

Example plot: Plot[{Cos[x], Sin[x], Tan[x]}, {x, 0, 2 π}] Now, just copy this plot from the notebook (using ctrl-C) and paste it in the front of following expression: /. a : RGBColor[__] :> ColorConvert[a, "Grayscale"] The result:


2

I noticed this problem recently (Feb 2016) following an update to Raspian's Jessie on the Raspberry Pi. My solution is probably specific to the RPi, and I apologize in advance if I am considered to have hijacked your question. I noticed upon starting Mathematica that I would get a similar LibGL swrast driver error. Following the suggestions mentioned here ...


1

Appears like this is not possible directly out of Mathematica. If you have a document that consists purely of equations like this: Then you can export to XML, then import the XML and modify the DOM, then export to HTML again. First save to XML: Then we need a method to insert this javascript into the doc: function loadTags(){ for(i=0; ...


2

You need this method i think: P1 = Plot[Sin[x], {x, 0, 6}]; P2 = Plot[Sin[x], {x, 0, 6}, AxesStyle -> Opacity[0]]; Overlay[{P1, P2}]


0

In Mathematica 10.3 the answer above is not working with Unicode characters dataset=Dataset[{<|"a"->1,"b"->2,"\[CapitalLambda]"->3|>,<|"a"->3,"b"->4,"\[CapitalLambda]"->5|>}] Export["test.json", dataset] File content is [ {"a": 1, "b": 2, "\[CapitalLambda]": 3}, {"a": 3, "b": 4, "\[CapitalLambda]": 5} ] But if ...


4

You can use the "FieldSeparators" option to specify what is used to separate fields: ExportString[a102, "Table", "FieldSeparators" -> " . . . "] 1 . . . 1 2 . . . 1 3 . . . 5 4 . . . 10 5 . . . 30 6 . . . 26 7 . . . 91 8 . . . 84 I believe the default is a Tab, entered as "\t". How that is displayed by external software is a different issue.


1

Confirmation rather than answer. I'm not sure the original example is entirely functional, at least it was not for me. Mine is... SetDirectory["F:\\Temp"]; (* Adjust to suit your environment *) hist = Histogram[RandomVariate[NormalDistribution[0, 1], 10000], ScalingFunctions -> "Log", ImageSize -> 600] Note log scale on y-axis in resulting ...


1

Using the "Byte" format when importing and exporting seems to work. In[1]:= CreateArchive["input", "input.zip"] Out[1]= "C:\\Users\\Andy\\Documents\\input.zip" In[2]:= enc = Encrypt["password", Import["input.zip", "Byte"]] Out[2]= EncryptedObject[<|Data -> ByteArray[< 320 >], InitializationVector -> ByteArray[< 16 >], ...


5

Documentation and Details ans Options section for CloudDeploy are saying: CloudDeploy[expr,...] automatically deploys all definitions needed to evaluate expr, much like CloudSave. and as we can see, it's not the case here. Or, it's a feature of Manipulate which boxes definitions are got by FrontEnd so maybe evaluation doesn't apply here. At the end, ...


3

You are trying to get Cases of Line in your plot. There are no lines in your plot, only points. data1 = ListLogLogPlot[Table[{i^2, i^(1/3)}, {i, 1, 20, 1}]]; Cases[data1, Point[data_] :> data, Infinity] (* {{{0., 0.}, {1.38629, 0.231049}, {2.19722, 0.366204}, {2.77259, 0.462098}, {3.21888, 0.536479}, {3.58352, 0.597253}, {3.89182, ...


0

OK, I'll just put up this work-around - it's not perfect because the scaling of the ticks has never worked properly, to my knowledge: list = {{{10., 5.}, {40., 20.}, {160., 80.}}, {{10., 1.83772}, {40., 13.6754}, {160., 67.3509}}, {{10., 8.16228}, {40., 26.3246}, {160., 92.6491}}}; myPlot = ListPlot[list, Frame -> True, FrameLabel -> ...



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