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1

At the risk of raising a question from the grave its worth noting that this has been clarified/corrected at some point. Its not clear whether it was just a typo in the Help or its later functionality. If you look at the XLSX help, the 4th Basic Example shows the correct syntax with Rules. Export["test2.xls", "Sheets" -> {"list1" -> list1, "list2" ...


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As Albert Retey notes in a comment, this seems to be a bug specific to version 7 (or perhaps just 7.0.1), given that this behavior is not observed in versions 6.0.2, 8.0.4, 9.0.1 or 10.0.2. Incidentally, you are absolutely right that the file is not exported correctly. If you use a different version to create it as it should be, version 7 will then be able ...


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You can use LineBreakWithin->False to fix this: Style[Grid[ConstantArray["blah blah blah", {5, 20}], Dividers -> All], LineBreakWithin -> False] Export["test.pdf", %]


0

If you have few of these, you can try "Save Selection As" as see in the following picture:


5

Put[OutputForm[outString], "testOut.txt"] compare with Put[outString, "testOut0.txt"] Alternatively, you can use Export: Export["testOut2.txt", outString] (* or Export["testOut2.txt", outString, "Text"] *) or, WriteStream (thanks: Mr.Wizard) strm = OpenWrite["testOut2.txt"]; WriteString[strm, outString] Close[strm] to get the same result:


2

You can export just the image to EPS by allowing rasterisation with the "AllowRasterization" option in Export. Export["testdata1.eps",t1,"AllowRasterization"->True] Hope this helps.


1

Export["mobius.stl", mobius] creates the desired file, which I can open with Photoshop CC, producing B&W top and side views. Presumably, more specialized software would give a true 3D image, although still B&W.


0

Taiki's suggestion works. The "ConversionRules" is now: "ConversionRules" -> { "Section" :> { "<h4 class=\"Section\"><a id=\"header-cell-" <> ToString[NumberForm[headerCount++, 6, "NumberPadding" -> {"0", "0"}]] <> "\">", "</a></h4>" } } The only weird thing is that all the numbers in the ...


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You could cheat by first importing the data and putting them in a list and when you are finished then you join the list with Join. it could look like this: prevData = Import["C:\\Users\\Alex\\Desktop\\1\\file1.nb"]; testData = RandomReal[{0, 1}, {1, 1}]; TestDate = Join[prevData, testData]; Export["C:\\Users\\Alex\\Desktop\\1\\file1.nb", testData];


1

Whereas the problem above is not solved I finally found a proper formulation of the Klein bottle immersion in 3 dimensions: r = 4 (1 - cos(u)/2) x = Piecewise[({ {r cos(u) cos(v) + 6 (sin(u) + 1) cos(u), 0 <= u < \[Pi]}, {r cos(v + \[Pi]) + 6 (sin(u) + 1) cos(u), \[Pi] <= u <= 2 \[Pi]} })] y = Piecewise[({ {r sin(u) cos(v) + 16 ...


1

You need to set the size of the elements of the scorecard. Have a look at Histogram's ImageSize option. Also you can set your tables in Grid or TableForm wrapped in a Pane or Panel to get them the size you want as well. They have ImageSize options as well. To help with the ImageSize parameters make use of UnitConvert to convert from your know dimensions in ...


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This isn't a real solution to the Export As PDF problem but it is a useful workaround in case other workarounds like reverting back to MMA 10.0.1 or using Export instead of Save As don't work for you (as was the case for me since I was already in MMA 10.0.1 and had used Export). You could of course always export as a raster graphics format like JPEG or PNG ...


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Try to avoid transparent Ticks, or FontSize -> 0, probably this is a problem for PDF. Instead you can define your Ticks directly without Labels, if you want to have them like that. V[r_] := Exp[-2 (r - 1)] - 2 Exp[-(r - 1)] p = Plot[V[r], {r, 0, 5}, Ticks -> { {#, ""} & /@ Range[0, 5, .5], {#, ""} & /@ Range[-1, 1, .25]}, AxesLabel -> ...


1

NumberFormat -> (Row[{#1, "e", If[#3 == "", "0", #3]}] &) The elements of NumberFormat need to be strings, so the 0 needs to be a "0" than it works. btw #1,#2,#3 are of course allready strings so ToString on any of these slots is not necessary.


1

You might define newStyleSheet = (SetOptions[InputNotebook[], StyleDefinitions -> #]) &} and then insert the lines newStyleSheet["Default.nb"] and newStyleSheet["Report.nb"] in the appropriate places in myExportForLatex. The second call of newStyleSheet being made to revert to your normal style.



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