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4

You can apply a strategy I learned from @Jens. Add the following to your notebook: Map[SetOptions[#, Prolog -> {{EdgeForm[], Texture[{{{0, 0, 0, 0}}}], Polygon[#, VertexTextureCoordinates -> #] &[{{0, 0}, {1, 0}, {1, 1}}]}}] &, {ParametricPlot}]; Give your plot a name: im1 = PlotU2Treh = ParametricPlot[ ...


1

You can use Streams and Low‐Level Input and Output to achieve this: Define an export function exportResults[fileName_String, results_] := Module[{strm = OpenAppend[fileName]}, Export[strm, {results}, "Table"]; WriteString[strm, "\n"]; Close[strm]; ] and then make it a part of your code (executing it at the end of each computation task with the ...


1

After solving your DE, do Table[{x, u[x]} /. %, {x, -3, 3, 0.01}] and save the output to a file "u.dat", which should make it a double column table.


2

The documentation of Image3D states: Slices of a 3D image may be stored in separate images file formats or different frames of a file format that support multiple frames (e.g. TIFF, DICOM, etc.). 3D geometry formats do not support 3D images, only Graphics3D.


2

Try with Export["data_output1.txt", AA, "CSV"]


2

There are three ways to solve this problem: Use Export instead of "Save Selection As ...", e.g. Export[FileNameJoin[{NotebookDirectory[], "graphic.png"}], %] Change the notebook magnification in the lower right corner of the notebook window to 100%. Use the menu Window ▶ Magnification to select any of the listed magnifications.


0

I have found a very good method. Right click on the image in mathematica as usual and save the image as .eps. Open this .eps file in Adobe Illustrator. Press Ctrl + A to select all the elements of the image. Press Ctrl + C to copy all the selected elements. Open word paste the image by pressing Ctrl + V. Save as pdf in the usual way. You will get a ...


5

I think the better solution that I find so far is shown as below: SetOptions[SelectedNotebook[], PrintingStyleEnvironment -> "Printout", ShowSyntaxStyles -> True]


7

Your plot is not symmetric since your plot has an AspectRatio of 1 while it should be 4/3. This also helps the problem with the cusp not going all the way to the boundary. I also made your boundary a bit cleaner. [...] boundary = Show[Graphics[{Black, Thick, Dashed, Line[#]}] & /@ Permutations[ {{0, Sqrt[6]/3}, {-(1/Sqrt[2]), -Sqrt[6]/6}, ...


0

This did not work for me because I wanted to create a Windows CSV file from a Macintosh. I tried DOSTextFormat->True but it did nothing. I found that you have the most control using the "Table" format because you can set the field and line separators. For CSV windows files: Export[fileToWrite, avgdata, "Table", "FieldSeparators" -> ",", ...


3

Is there a way of creating a 3D animation from the 2D animation? You have misunderstood the whole thing. An animation is simply a series of images that are displayed after one another. If you want a 3D animation, make the frames in 3D. If you want 2D, make the frames in 2D. u[x_, t_] = -(1/2) Cos[x - t]^2 + 1; frames = Table[Plot3D[u[x, t], {x, -2 Pi, ...


4

Simply replace Animate with Table and store the result in a variable. I also edited your time range and suppressed the result with a semi-colon. u[x_, t_] = -(1/2) Cos[x - t]^2 + 1; pics = Table[Plot[u[x, t], {x, -10, 10}, PlotRange -> {0, 1.5}, PlotStyle -> {Red, Thickness[0.005]}], {t, 0, 2 Pi, 2 Pi/50}]; Now, Export: Export["anim.gif", pics] ...


3

I see this problem too, and I found it is fixed in Skim and Preview by using this function: rasterTrick[plot_] := Show[plot, Prolog -> {Opacity[0], Texture[{{{0, 0, 0, 0}}}], VertexTextureCoordinates -> {{0, 0}, {1, 0}, {1, 1}}, Polygon[{{0, 0}, {.1, 0}, {.1, .1}}]}] Export["regionIBD_MatrixPlot1.pdf", mPlot // rasterTrick] The ...


7

To long for a comment, but looks great on "10.0 for Mac OS X x86 (64-bit) (June 29, 2014)" with AR, Preview and Skim. Shut-down and restart your system and try with an alternative viewer ... Edit @Jens response is fantastic, right? The procedure improves the resolution dramatically and even reduced the size. I was able to test both algorithms on iMac ...


0

You can use, i.e. specify FontFamily for your choice of font, if the font is installed on your system the font will be embedded: ?? FontFamily FontFamily is an option for Style and Cell that specifies the font family in which text should be rendered.  >> Attributes[FontFamily]={Protected} . SetDirectory@NotebookDirectory[]; . plot = Plot[ ...


3

I wish to expand the answer by Simon Woods according to my current understanding. The key point is that a BMP file normally does not contain a 2D array of RGB triplets but instead it contains a color table which lists all unique RGB triplets used in the image and assigns to each of them an index. The 2D array encoding the image contains only indices of ...


4

You can obtain an 8-bit BMP by converting the image to an 8-bit representation: Export["test.bmp", Image[image, "Byte"]] Note that Import["test.bmp","ColorSpace"] will still return RGBColor, because an 8-bit BMP is still in the RGB color space (there is a color table which specifies an RGB color for each of the 256 possible pixel values - while it is very ...



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