Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

22

If this is something you want in general, try: SetOptions[$FrontEnd, PrintPrecision-> 10] and if you just want it for a specific notebook, then do: SetOptions[InputNotebook[], PrintPrecision-> 10]


18

PrintPrecision You can control the number of digits displayed using the PrintPrecision option. You have a number of options for its use. You can set it Globally or for the specific Notebook using the Options Inspector. You can also use it directly with Style: Style[123.189094, PrintPrecision -> 10] 123.189094 You can set it temporarily for one ...


14

Maybe this : NumberForm[#, 10] &@ {123.189094`, 123.189263`} {123.189094, 123.189263 } ? Edit Consider also this utility of NumberForm[ x, {m, k}] giving m real digits of x with k digits to the right of the decimal point, e.g. NumberForm[#, {10, 7}] &@ { 197.9898987322333, 201.73205080756887 } { 197.9898987, 201.7320508 }


13

Typesetting in Text cells Cell[TextData[Cell[BoxData[ FormBox[ RowBox[{ FractionBox["1", "N"], RowBox[{ UnderoverscriptBox["\[Sum]", RowBox[{"i", "=", "1"}], "N"], FractionBox[ RowBox[{ SubsuperscriptBox[ OverscriptBox["x","~"], "j", "i"], "(", RowBox[{"k", "|", "k"}], ")"}], SqrtBox[ ...


12

Two possible answers. TexForm converts a Mathematica expression into something you can use to paste it in TeX: TeXForm[x/Sqrt[5]] ==> \frac{x}{\sqrt{5}} A usually more convenient way of achieving this is right-clicking output, and selecting Copy as | LaTeX. If all you're looking for is a neater display form inside Mathematica, then have a look at ...


11

The Program style is purpose-built for this sort of thing: If you do not like the look of the bars above and below the cell, you can remove them by selecting the cell and changing the CellFrame option in the Option Inspector:


11

I consider this a bug in the front end. Very odd it is, that not all forms eat up the first result. Consider this simple example m = {1}; MatrixForm@m MatrixForm@m which gives 2 outputs as expected. If we look on the traffic between kernel and front end, then we see, that the kernel indeed sends 2 outputs back. No matter which kind of form we use: FE ...


9

Use NumberForm: NumberForm[{123.189094, 123.189263}, 9]


9

Mathematica 10 is not high-DPI-aware on Windows and so Windows renders it at the native resolution and then scales it by a factor of 2 by default to make it readable. Once Mathematica supports high-DPI displays in Windows, they will be able to properly render text and graphics that aren't blurry. If you're running Windows 8.1, you can disable this default ...


8

If you just want the output, well, write it manually. EscpwEsc gives you the piecewise bracket. Then you can insert a table (Insert->Table/Matrix) or learn the shortcuts with Ctrl, and CtrlReturn, etc. I got this box structure. You can see the result by running. RawBoxes@FormBox[ RowBox[{"\[Piecewise]", GridBox[{{RowBox[{"0", ","}], ...


8

Here are three progressively more intrusive steps to troubleshoot Mathematica. Hold down Shift-Control (Shift-Command on Mac) while starting Mathematica, as described here. If this didn't fix the problem, move to the next step. Evaluate SystemOpen[$UserBaseDirectory]. This will reveal the directory where Mathematica keeps all its settings, packages, ...


7

You can use something like this dx /: MakeBoxes[dx[a_], fmt_] := RowBox[{FractionBox["\[PartialD]", "\[PartialD]x"], MakeBoxes[a, fmt], "=", MakeBoxes[#, fmt] &@D[a, x]}]; dx[Sin[x]] dx[Sin[x]] // TraditionalForm I prefer MakeBoxes but it also can be implemented with Format ClearAll[dx] Format[dx[a_]] := ...


7

The other answers are fine, but if all the interest is in the small-end digits, consider something like: ((RealDigits /@ {123.189094`, 123.189263`}) /. {a__, 0..} -> {a})[[All, 1, -4 ;; -1]] {{9, 0, 9, 4}, {9, 2, 6, 3}} This picks up the smallest-end non-zero digits so you can focus on them. This won't work if your numbers have a different ...


7

To expand my comment into an answer: HoldForm[X[x, y, z]] == X[x, y, z] // TraditionalForm $$X(x,y,z)=\left( \left\{ \begin{array}{cc} \frac{3}{4 \pi } & \sqrt{x^2+y^2+z^2}\leq 1 \\ 0 & \text{True} \\ \end{array} \right. \right)$$ But Mathematica decides it needs parentheses. I agree that this doesn't look ideal. There are a couple of ways ...


6

InputForm gives {123.189094, 123.189263} // InputForm (*==> {123.189094, 123.189263} *)


5

On a Windows machine you can set the display resolution in terms of DPI yourself (in the Display control panel). Whereas 96 DPi is a common setting for normal density screens, 120 DPI is useful and common for high density screens. This has effect on font size and appearance and also on thing like icons. 96 x 1.25 = 120. Other options can be found in the ...


5

Simon's method does seem to work, and I cannot explain why either. However, I recommend a different method. I suggest you convert all the exact numbers to machine precision as this typically evaluates much faster. In fact my fix for your problem with the other question was to add N so that the array could be packed, and the same method works here. Using ...


5

Both colour functions fail for me with Raster. I don't have an answer to why it happens, but I do have a workaround, which is to inject the evaluated colour data into Function using With: GoldColor = With[{x = {{0, Black}, {1/9, RGBColor[32/97, 1/62, 0]}, {2/5, RGBColor[44/59, 23/78, 1/32]}, {3/5, RGBColor[84/85, 1/2, 4/51]}, {2/3, RGBColor[84/85, ...


5

I'm not sure I understood the concerns, so let me know how this works. The N[Pi , 50] isn't recalculated since Dragger doesn't have the attributes HoldFirst or family. Seems it can be dragged anywhere. And I don't know about the rest. Dragger[exp_, size_] := With[{maxsize = First[ImageSize /. Options[Rasterize@exp, ImageSize]] - 0.95 size}, ...


5

UPDATE Nice work, OP, with $OutputForms. I did not know about that. Here is my take on a complete solution that takes advantage of that find, and adds input handling with MakeExpression. I can't think of a situation in which this would be superior to InterpretationBox for this problem, but it is helpful in more complex cases. If[ FreeQ[$OutputForms, pm = ...


4

You could use the \[AligmentMarker] character. To help you better write equations, lets forget about the DisplayFormula style and lets create our own. Set up: Let us create the style DisplayMath. In your notebook where you are writing your displayed equation go to Format > Edit Stylesheet.... Here you will create a new cell. Show the expression of the ...


4

There are many ways to do this, depending on how you want to display the coordinates. The following example displays the coordinates in four ways (other than reading them from the graph itself). 1) The first uses a Text graphics primitive in the Epilog option. 2) The second uses the Tooltip applied to a Point graphics primitive also in the Epilog option. ...


4

I see three ways: Copy and paste everything into a new notebook (to ensure we don't destroy the output for good). Then select Cell -> Delete All Output from the menu. alt-click (⌥-click on a Mac) on an input cell's bracket. All input cells will get selected. Now copy them and paste them into a new notebook. alt-click (⌥-click on a Mac) on an input ...


4

Something like this? (V9 and after only, because of Cells.) toggleCellOpen[nb_: SelectedNotebook[]] := (CurrentValue[#, CellOpen] = Not@CurrentValue[#, CellOpen]) & /@ Select[Cells[], CurrentValue[#, Evaluatable] &]


4

I think I finally found the right way. $OutputForms is a list of the formatting functions that get stripped off when wrapped around the output. $OutputForms= ...


4

Boxes are just like any other expression when they are evaluated by the kernel, so one way to achieve this is with replacement rules: ToBoxes@Quantity[3, "Meters"] /. (DisplayFunction -> _) -> (DisplayFunction -> (RowBox@{#1, " метра"} &)) // RawBoxes 3 метра


4

Format[binom[a_, b_]] := TraditionalForm@Binomial[a, b] Now binom[a, b] $a \choose b$ and With[{a = 10, b = 5}, binom[a, b]] 252


3

I suspect that this has something to do with the code that produces the InputForm cell tags, or rather tagged cells. In addition to the last tagged cell replacing the prior ones you can observe strange behavior when combining CellPrint and InputForm: InputForm[1 // CellPrint] InputForm[2 // CellPrint] InputForm[3 // CellPrint] 1 Out[1]//InputForm= 2 ...


3

You need to use BoxData. Because ToString creates something strange you also obviously have to change "\\" -> "". I don't know if this is a bug or working as designed. equat = (StringReplace[ToString[#1, TraditionalForm], "\\" -> ""] & )[ Expand[ Product[x - RandomInteger[{-10, 10}], {i, 3 + RandomInteger[]}]]]; CellPrint[ ...


3

I recommend that you export your data to a file. But having said that, I think that a normal Print will have the same effect as the hypothetical Short[%,Infinity]. For example (*generate some data*) data = RandomReal[{-1, 1}, 10^4]; (*This will display truncated*) data (*So will this*) Short[data, 100] (*This will display all the data*) Print[data]



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible