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1

The simplest way I thick is to use Dynamic["your function"] instated of 1 in your controller. Control[{{A, 0.1, "Amplitude"}, 0, Dynamic["your function"], 0.01, Appearance -> {"Labeled", "Closed"}}] I think this will give you want you want, (assuming the function of the end is f+1): Manipulate[ Plot[A Sin[2 Pi f t/12], {t, 0, 12}, PlotRange -> ...


2

I just want to point out the Edmund's fancy version of Manipulate is unnecessarily complicated. The same effects can be gotten with much simpler code. Manipulate[ Plot[Sin[a + b x], {x, 0, 10}], Row[{ Control[{{a, 0, ""}, {0, 1}}], " ", Dynamic @ Switch[a, 0, "Zero", 1, "One"]}], {{b, 1, ""}, 1, 5, Appearance -> "Labeled"}] ...


4

A simple way is to define your Manipulate variable parameters so that they are recognised as the control type you want. Look in the first part of the Details and Options section of Manipulate documentation. Manipulate[ Plot[Sin[a + b x], {x, 0, 10}], {{a, 0}, {0, 1}}, {b, 1, 5}] You can get fancier by specifying the controls and layout directly. ...


6

I'm not sure about all the arguments, but maybe this will get you started: Clear[MultiSlider]; MultiSlider[Dynamic[xs_], {st_, end_}] := LocatorPane[Dynamic[xs], Graphics[{LightGray, Thickness[0.015], Line[{{st, 0}, {end, 0}}]}], {{st, 0}, {end, 0}}] Manipulate[ x, {{x, Table[{2 i, 0}, {i, 5}]}, 0, 12, MultiSlider[##] &}] You can constrain ...



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