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9

This is an artifact in Graphics3D rendering (Z-fighting) which is generally difficult to avoid when using a depth buffer. While ArrayMesh is new in 10.4, you would see similar behavior if you did copy and paste the result into an older version. As a possible workaround, try SetOptions[$FrontEnd, RenderingOptions -> {"Graphics3DRenderingEngine" ...


8

This MathGroup discussion should answer your question, so I'll cite it here: On Tue, 29 May 2012 05:47:52 -0400 (EDT), JCW wrote: Please forgive my dragging up ancient history: I have been using Mathematica from version 2.2 through 7.0. I remember at least one (maybe two?) format conversions that were necessary to update old ...


7

To whom it may concern, a workaround: path = FileNameJoin[{$HomeDirectory, "Desktop", "testWorking.nb"}]; nb = Notebook[{}, Saveable -> False, NotebookEventActions -> {{"MenuCommand", "Save"} :> {}} (*the fix*) ]; Export[path, nb, "NB"]


6

LogLogPlot plots contain a dynamic objects which when you open the notebook, the security of Mathematica prevents the dynamic objects from being updated. Check this What you can do is wrap your plot with dynamic and when opened again and when you click Enable Dynamic, you will get the correct plot. Dynamic@Labeled[LogLogPlot[x, {x, 10^-5, 1}], "Test"]


6

Without SetPrecision it actually doesn't work fine in Mathematica 10.4.1: In[2]:= NSolve[eqn, {h, r, fc}] Out[2]= {{h -> 45112.4 + 69798. I, r -> 3.6894*10^11 - 2.09612*10^12 I, fc -> -3.94833*10^7 - 4.35473*10^7 I}, {h -> 0.387583 + 0.0290387 I, r -> 44.9117 - 8.67483 I, fc -> 415.19 + 53.0697 I}} In[3]:= eqn /. % Out[3]= ...


5

Graphics3D[ {Cylinder[ Most[mat.Append[#, 1]] & /@ {{0, 0, 0}, {0, 0, 20}}, 5]}, PlotRange -> All, ClipPlanes -> {{0, 0, -1, 6}}, ClipPlanesStyle -> {Directive[Opacity[.3], Green]}] Just for fun, here is a swept volume generation demo. trans= "1:eJxTTMoPSmNkYGAoFgMSIUWJecVp+UW5iSWZ+\ ...


4

Works fine in Mathematica 10.4.1 NSolve[SetPrecision[eqn, 16], {h, r, fc}] // Chop (* {{h -> 0.3876007531699077 + 0.0289254524823553 I, r -> 44.91373180094011 - 8.66855962462205 I, fc -> 415.1894059341150 + 53.0819264533987 I}} *)


4

This is a bug in DiscreteConvolve[]. The bug is caused by a missing condition (m>=0) in one term of the answer returned by DiscreteConvolve[] for your example. A workaround for the problem is to apply PiecewiseExpand[] to the first two arguments of DiscreteConvolve[] as shown below. h = (1/2)^n UnitStep[n] - 3*(1/2)^(n - 1) UnitStep[n - 1]; g = 3^n ...


4

The workaround suggested by Algohi works but it leads to reevaluation of the entire LogLogPlot each time you open a Notebook. The following workaround avoids this: With[{g = Labeled[LogLogPlot[x, {x, 10^-5, 1}], "Test"]}, Dynamic@g] Another workaround is to place this Graphics as Inset inside of another Graphics object: pl = LogLogPlot[x, {x, 10^-5, 1}]; ...


4

There is a straightforward way to set CellMargins to be zero: DialogInput[ DialogNotebook[{ExpressionCell[Pane[RandomImage[], ImageMargins -> 8], CellMargins -> 0]}]] Instead of ImageMargins we can rely on CellFrameMargins: DialogInput[ DialogNotebook[{ExpressionCell[RandomImage[], CellMargins -> 0, CellFrameMargins -> 8, ...


3

I gave up looking for neat solution. Here's brute force. Since the bottom CellMargins are not respected then let's not use any! :) We can use Pane and its ImageMargins to take control over padding. DialogInput[ DynamicModule[{}, Pane[RandomImage[], ImageMargins -> 8], Initialization :> (SetOptions[EvaluationCell[], CellMargins -> ...


3

No, it doesn't. But this workaround helps: reg = ImplicitRegion[x^2 + y^2 <= 1, {x, y}] RegionPlot[reg, BoundaryStyle -> Darker, PlotStyle -> White]


3

Looks like you've uncovered a bug. I can confirm this behavior in 10.3.1 and 10.4. You can still discretize your region using DiscretizeGraphics though: r = DiscretizeGraphics@ RegionPlot[0 < Sin[u]/Cos[v] < 1 && 0 < Sin[v]/Cos[u] < 1, {u, 0, 2}, {v, 0, 2}] And if you want finer areas, use DiscretizeRegion: DiscretizeRegion[r, ...


3

Not a bug - it's a feature!! First let's import the data in as quick a fashion as possible, arableLandPerPopulation=<<"https://gist.githubusercontent.com/jasondbiggs/9e915145a2d4cfa34119fa4d0e535ed2/raw/75387a17c21ee7ff9d7f21e528ca2f971e24209b/gistfile1.txt"; Now look at the GeoRegionValuePlot with and without the PlotRange specified ...


3

TechSupport acknowledged and proposed a simple workaround by putting inert expression, e.g. empty string, inside the { }: NDSolve[{x'[t] == x[t], x[0] == 1, WhenEvent[Mod[t, 1] == 0, {""}]}, x, {t, 0, 3}]


3

Set ImagePadding option to None. (With None the exported image is cut a bit on the y-axis so use 10 instead of None) Plot[(180 Sqrt[\[Pi]^2 - 625 t] (\[Pi]^2 (-25 + 36 t) - 1500 t (-15 + 45 t -Sqrt[-\[Pi]^2 + 900 t])))/(\[Pi]^4 Sqrt[-\[Pi]^2 + 2500 t]) + Tan[2 Sqrt[\[Pi]^2 - 625 t]], {t, 0.01, 0.016}, AxesStyle -> {{Directive[Red, 12], ...


2

It seems to be a bug. I advise you to report this to Wolfram support, e.g. by using the "Give Feedback..." option on the Help menu or via their website.


2

I reported this to WRI tech support. This is what I sent them I have encountered an issue when evaluating an example given in ref/ImplicitRegion. The example before I evaluated its code showed a circle. Evaluation should have redrawn the circle, but it actually produced a blank plot. I enclose a screen capture to illustrate the problem. screen capture ...


2

Lets start with a simpler case Integrate[q0/(-1 + a q^2), q] $\frac{\log \left(1-a \text{q}^2\right)}{2 a}$ When you put limit [0,A], it has no problem with q=0. But it is not defined when $aA^2>1$. So you always have to obey that condition. You can check that by Integrate[q0/(-1 + a q0^2), {q0, 0, A}] In your second case Integrate[q0/(-1 + 12. ...


2

It really expects that you have some buttons along the bottom. DialogInput[Column[{Pane @ RandomImage[], Button["OK", DialogReturn[0]]}]] but you can do it this way DialogInput[Column[{Pane @ RandomImage[], ""}]] Update I Think it looks better with the bottom margin a bit larger than the top, but if you are being picky about equal margins, try ...


2

This is a Linux-specific bug that has been fixed in Mathematica 10.0.2 and later.


2

Let's look at a simpler example to show the problem. We'll create a Delaunay mesh from some random points, and generate a RegionBoundary from that. In version 10.4: SeedRandom[4]; mr1 = DelaunayMesh[RandomReal[1, {15, 2}]]; mr2 = RegionBoundary[mr1]; Show[mr1, HighlightMesh[mr2, 1], ListLinePlot[MeshCoordinates@mr2, PlotStyle -> Directive[Thick, ...



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