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14

I would like provide an alternative answer using the method of Simon Woods to extract the contour lines. However, in contrast to his approach I prefer to have them as long as possible. This is achieved by the StreamScale -> Full option. nlines = 30; flist = {-1 - x^2 + y, 1 + x - y^2}; xmn = -3; xmx = 3; ymn = -3; ymx = 3; subint = 3; plot = ...


3

I guess you're looking for something like this: wave[x_, y_, x0_, y0_, l_, t_] := Sin[Sqrt[(x - x0)^2 + (y - y0)^2]/l + t]; Manipulate[ DensityPlot[ wave[x, y, d, 0, l1, t l1 l2] + wave[x, y, -d, 0, l2, t l1 l2], {x, -100, 100}, {y, -100, 100}, Mesh -> 10, PlotPoints -> 50], {d, 5, 20}, {l1, 5, 20}, {l2, 5, 20}, {t, 0, 1}] d ...


27

I think you might be better off creating Graphics directly instead of using the StreamPlot style options. In this example I use StreamPlot just once and extract the coordinates of the arrows, which I use to create Line objects with VertexColors. The animation is made by cycling the vertex colors. plot = StreamPlot[{-1 - x^2 + y, 1 + x - y^2}, {x, -3, 3}, {y,...


12

Not as great as the original but should serve as a good starting point. The code should probably be self-explanatory... (* parameters *) innerradius = 20; outerradius = 23; numvertices = 12; xrange = {-100, 100}; yrange = {-100, 100}; numframes = 150; colour = Black; finalangle = 720 Degree; (* must be a multiple of 360 Degree / numvertices *) blurring = 10;...


1

You seem to know all the pieces you need except for Manipulate. As a self-contained example: table = RandomInteger[10, {100, 4}]; a = GatherBy[table, Last]; Manipulate[ ListPointPlot3D[ a[[i]][[All, 1 ;; 3]] ], {i, 1, Length @ a, 1} ] An additional example this time using GroupBy, and a few customizations. table[[All, 4]] *= 7; (* change values in ...


0

My answer is nothing more than a complement of learned with @C. E.: t1 = Import["~/Downloads/ElementosPNG/1.png"]; t2 = Import["~/Downloads/ElementosPNG/2.png"]; t3 = Import["~/Downloads/ElementosPNG/3.png"]; I added some points for me to locate: p1={136,173.4};p2={54.8,54.2};p3={1009.2,54.2}; p4={81.3,80.5}; width[texture_]:=ImageDimensions[texture][[1]...


4

The trick is to create rectangles that cover the bounding boxes of each component image and use the images as textures, then we can use Rotate and Translate to animate the robot arm the way we want. To that end, we may use this code: t1 = Import["~/Downloads/ElementosPNG/1.png"]; t2 = Import["~/Downloads/ElementosPNG/2.png"]; t3 = Import["~/Downloads/...


0

This should work: g = {g0, g1, g2, g3, g4}; s = {S0, S1, S2, S3, S4}; Animate[Labeled[Graphics3D[g[[i]], ViewPoint -> Front], s[[i]],Top], {i, 1, 5, 1}, AnimationRunning -> False,PreserveImageOptions -> False]


0

I think what you are asking is a default feature. For example ListAnimate[Table[Graphics3D[{Hue[x], Cuboid[]}], {x, 0, 1, .01}]] If you pause it, rotate the Cuboid and then play again, you will see that it will resume its initial position.



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