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This question already has an answer here:

How to split the curve with more equidistant points?

   lpts={{1., 0., 0.}, {0.540302, 0.841471, 0.25}, {-0.416147, 0.909297, 0.5}, 
    {-0.989992, 0.14112, 0.75}, {-0.653644, -0.756802, 1.}, {0.283662, -0.958924, 1.25},   
    {0.96017, -0.279415, 1.5}, {0.753902, 0.656987, 1.75}, {-0.1455, 0.989358, 2.}, 
    {-0.91113, 0.412118, 2.25}};

   l = Line@lpts;
   Show[Graphics3D[{Blue, Thick, l}, Boxed -> False],
     Graphics3D[{Red, PointSize[Large], Point[lpts]}]]

enter image description here

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marked as duplicate by Szabolcs, Öskå, Mr.Wizard Jul 29 '14 at 20:22

This question was marked as an exact duplicate of an existing question.

1  
You can interpolate between the points (Interpolation) then use the linked answer to make the equidistant points. – Szabolcs Jul 29 '14 at 20:08
1  
Also related: (8970), (39394) – Mr.Wizard Jul 29 '14 at 20:23
    
@BeingHuman The question "Equidistant points on a polyline" also uses points. Have you looked at that question? It starts with p = RandomReal[{-1, 1}, {20, 2}];, which is a set of 2D points. – Szabolcs Jul 29 '14 at 22:49
1  
@BeingHuman I know you have 3D, but that doesn't mean that the solutions from the linked question don't work with no or little modification. Please do try. If you have trouble with them, then ask. – Szabolcs Jul 29 '14 at 22:59
    
@Szabolcs Thanks for the link, it worked. – User12309 Jul 30 '14 at 20:09