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I'd like to start learning Lisp as it sometimes leads to interesting answers on this site with concepts borrowed from this language, so I'm curious. As I already spend most of my programming time in Mathematica, is there a way to execute Lisp programs from the Mathematica frontend?

Same question for related languages, like Haskell or OCaml.

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I suppose you've seen this: stackoverflow.com/a/5451304/695132 Are you looking for a way to run some other language from the front end or to call it from the kernel? –  Szabolcs Apr 13 '12 at 7:19
    
@Szabolcs: I guess what he wants is something like MathLink, but for Lisp. –  celtschk Apr 13 '12 at 7:45
    
@Szabolcs yes I was looking for something like in the answer of WReach. The link of rubenko seems to do this. –  Faysal Aberkane Apr 13 '12 at 8:37
    
One possible appraoch is to use a Lisp that runs on the JVM (for instance, ABCL), and then get at Mathematica through J/Link. –  Pillsy Apr 13 '12 at 13:49
    
@Pillsy I think your comment could be an answer even if it's not tested yet. –  Faysal Aberkane Apr 13 '12 at 13:56
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4 Answers 4

Have a look at SchemeLink.

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Thanks, I will try this when I can. –  Faysal Aberkane Apr 13 '12 at 8:33
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Clojure is often described as a "modern-day LISP" (hosted on the JVM) that offers strong support for multi-threaded code.

If the Clojure dialect of LISP is an option for you then you might want to investigate using the JLink-based interface to Clojure provided courtesy of this package: Clojuratica

Regarding Haskell and OCaml, your best bet may be trying to access F# (which is closely related to Haskell and OCaml) through .NETLink.

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Nice link, thanks –  Faysal Aberkane May 20 '12 at 21:13
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I haven't actually tried this, but you might want to investigate using one of the Lisps for the JVM, such as Armed Bear Common Lisp, and interface to Mathematica through J/Link.

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