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when I use

FileDate[filename,"Creation"]

it gives messages like

FileDate::nocreationunix: The Creation date of a file is not available on Macintosh and Unix. >>

FileDate::nocreationunix: The Creation date of a file is not available on Macintosh and Unix. >>

FileDate::nocreationunix: The Creation date of a file is not available on Macintosh and Unix. >>

Why?

Edit

I forgot to say my OS. My OS is Linux. As george2079 said, Linux don't have creation date. But I found FileDate[filename,"Change"] works like "Creation" in windows system.

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useful information - OS version, Mathematica version,... –  cormullion Nov 19 '13 at 9:03
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2 Answers 2

On Mac OS X, version 10.9, Mathematica version 9.0.1 can distinguish between creation and modification dates. For a typical notebook:

DateDifference[
      FileDate[filename, "Creation"], 
      FileDate[filename, "Modification"], 
   "Minute"]

returns

{126.083, "Minute"}

which I presume means that this file was worked on during a period of about two hours.

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Linux simply does not store creation date. (Its ultimately an ambiguous quantity).

Presumably macs are the same, being linux based. (Thought way back when the original mac system did track creation date)

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/14842195/how-to-get-file-creation-date-time-in-bash-debian

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1  
OS X does store file cration date. –  shrx Nov 19 '13 at 0:45
    
I can confirm that Mathematica returns a file date creation on my Mac (OS X 10.8.5, MMA v9.0.1). –  David Skulsky Nov 19 '13 at 0:52
    
then how can I distinguish two files from the date. If one of the file is just a copy of the other, they have the same modified timestamp. –  matheorem Nov 19 '13 at 0:57
    
what difference does it make? –  george2079 Nov 19 '13 at 1:13
    
OS X is not Linux based; it is Free BSD based. –  m_goldberg Nov 19 '13 at 7:04
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