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I am looking for an add-on that deals seriously with computations inside exceptional Lie algebras (and obviously classical ones ...): I want at least all standard basic data concerning them & their representations to be included.

I found some old ones but quite incomplete (no E6 or above).

Do you have any recommendations or links to suggest . Thank you very much in advance.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Since nobody answered this question, I did research by myself. IMO, the best available free Mathematica for Lie Algebras is LieART (version 1.0.1) which includes all the exceptional Lie Algebras and a lot more (like branching rules), and is quite natural to use. The latex package included (lie art.sty) generates some conflicts when compiled with Latex but easily solved by changing some definitions.

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I feel bad that both your questions went unanswered and you had to find the answer yourself. Still, props to you for researching and sharing your findings with us! I'd vote again for the spirit, if I could. Hope you have better luck with your next question... :) –  rm -rf Nov 1 '13 at 17:29
    
@rm-rf thank you very much for your support. I was beginning to wonder if the question was not appropriate for this site because too specialized ! –  brunoh Nov 1 '13 at 22:17
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It certainly is way outside my scope, but this site has its share of specialists and questions on specialized subjects. For instance, here is one on category theory (which I know nothing about) and the developer of the package is also a user here. The more exotic or smaller the field, the lesser the chances of running into a developer/another user from the field, but still worth a try :) –  rm -rf Nov 1 '13 at 22:33
    
It is surprising that after all this time there is not yet a standard package for groups and algebras. I would expect some legend to grow of this, similar to the question of the inexistence of a Nobel Prize for mathematics. –  arivero Oct 16 at 20:21

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