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I have a certain equation containing a parameter c, such that for every value of c there is a single solution of the equation.

I wish to have a list of all solutions corresponding, each of them, to the different values of c in a given range.

I have used

T = Table[ w /. Solve[w*Log[w] - e*w^(1/2) == c, w, Reals], {c, 1, 10, 1}]

This works and I obtain the 10 solutions corresponding to c = 1, 2...10.

 {{4.4989256507239313855}, {5.0155085347814587062}, {5.4994454287788402440}, 
  {5.9587216614816363100}, {6.3984744406908479586}, {6.8222447912647899011}, 
  {7.2325989427780299245}, {7.6314689550398679842}, {8.0203537580410561930},  
  {8.4004448085415049246}}

The trouble is that the list contains all numbers placed in brace. As such, they are not recognised as numbers. I cannot plot them, I cannot subtract them, element by element, from another list etc. Is there any way to remove the braces?

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please don't shout. It looks like spam if you do. –  Jan Dvorak Aug 28 '13 at 19:38
    
l={numbers in braces}; First/@l –  Pickett Aug 28 '13 at 19:41
    
Solve returns a List of answers since there may be more than one. If you want to use the first solution you can use First@Solve[...] to extract that one, which should work in this case. Otherwise Flatten in general removes nested lists as tjm167us has answered. –  jVincent Aug 28 '13 at 19:53
    
Just an fyi... the code producing the table does not work as is –  tjm167us Aug 28 '13 at 19:54
1  
You could use Flatten, or First, or Part. Also see (6669) and linked/related questions. –  Mr.Wizard Aug 28 '13 at 20:07
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closed as off-topic by Mr.Wizard Aug 28 '13 at 20:03

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

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1 Answer

I'm not sure this is what you're asking, but:

Flatten[{{4.4989256507239313855}, {5.0155085347814587062}, 
{5.4994454287788402440}, {5.9587216614816363100}, 
{6.3984744406908479586}, {6.8222447912647899011}, 
{7.2325989427780299245}, {7.6314689550398679842}, 
{8.0203537580410561930}, {8.4004448085415049246}}]

yields:

{4.498925650723931386, 5.015508534781458706, 5.499445428778840244, 
5.958721661481636310, 6.3984744406908479586, 6.8222447912647899011, 
7.2325989427780299245, 7.631468955039867984, 8.020353758041056193, 
8.400444808541504925}
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