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I must plot some data in radians and would like to use this image as a background to that graph. Although it looks good the lines are degraded in image form. thus the reason for this question. Can something like this be drawn in Mathematica? Colored Circular Graph

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7 Answers 7

up vote 31 down vote accepted

Here's a start. I'll leave the labeling and fine tuning the details to you:

With[{thin = {Thin, Opacity[0.4]}},
    RegionPlot[x^2 + y^2 <= 1, {x, -1, 1}, {y, -1, 1}, 
        ColorFunction -> (Hue[ArcTan[#, #2]/(2 π)] &), 
        ColorFunctionScaling -> False, PlotPoints -> 100, Frame -> False,
        Mesh -> {21, 21, 10, 7, 47}, MeshStyle -> {thin, thin, thin, thin, thin}, 
        MeshFunctions -> {# &, #2 &, Norm[{#1, #2}] &, ArcTan[# , #2] &, ArcTan[# , #2] &}
    ]
]

enter image description here

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Fantastic! Thank you! –  R Hall May 25 '13 at 23:00
    
Just noticed the hues are rotated slightly, how can that be corrected? Thanks very much! –  R Hall May 26 '13 at 1:17
2  
@RHall Hue has Red at zero, whereas your image has red at $\pi/6$. So all you need to do would be to change the numerator inside Hue[...] to ArcTan[#, #2] - π/6. –  rm -rf May 26 '13 at 1:32
    
@RHall btw, if you like some of the other, more detailed answers, feel free to unaccept mine and accept theirs (assuming you accepted mine just because it was the first answer). –  rm -rf Jun 8 '13 at 16:26

It is of course possible to draw everything manually.

enter image description here

Manipulate[
 With[{
   colArea = 
    Polygon[#2, VertexColors -> ConstantArray[Hue[#1/(2 Pi)], 3]] & @@@ 
    Table[{phi, {{0, 0}, {Cos[phi], Sin[phi]}, {Cos[phi + 2 Pi/colors], 
       Sin[phi + 2 Pi/colors]}}}, {phi, 0, 2 Pi - 2 Pi/colors, 2 Pi/colors}],
   gridLines = 
    Table[{{x, -#}, {x, #}} &[Sqrt[1 - x^2]], {x, -1, 1, 
      2/(grid - 1)}],
   radLines = Table[{{0, 0}, {Cos[phi], Sin[phi]}}, 
      {phi, 0, 2 Pi - 2 Pi/radiants, 2 Pi/radiants}],
   cirLines = With[{
     circle = Table[{Cos[phi], Sin[phi]}, {phi, 0, 2 Pi, Pi/20}]},
     Table[r*circle, {r, 0, 1, 1/circles}]
   ]},
   Graphics[{
    colArea, Black, Thin, Line[gridLines], 
    Line[Map[Reverse, gridLines, {2}]], Darker@Gray, Line@radLines, 
    Line /@ cirLines}]],
 {circles, 3, 10, 1},
 {radiants, 4, 20, 1},
 {grid, 5, 20, 1},
 {{colors, 20}, 4, 120, 1}
 ]

Update

By the way, it is not required to create a new coordinate list for all graphics primitives. This was only done to make the code verbose enough. The color disk, the radial lines and the circles can all be created easily using the same underlying data. Here the Span operator (;;) becomes handy, to achieve high resolution in the color disk, but have only some radial grid lines.

With[{pts = Append[#, First[#]] &@ Table[{r {Cos[phi], Sin[phi]}, phi/(2 Pi)}, 
  {phi, 0, 2 Pi, .1}, {r, 0, 1, .1}]},
Graphics[{Polygon[{{0, 0}, First[#1], First[#2]}, 
  VertexColors -> (Hue /@ {{0, 0, 1}, Last[#1], Last[#2]})] & @@@ 
    Partition[pts[[All, -1, {1, 2}]], 2, 1],
  Black, Opacity[.5], Line[pts[[;; ;; 3, All, 1]]], Line[Transpose[pts[[All, All, 1]]]],
  Opacity[.2], {Line[#], Line[Map[Reverse, #, {2}]]} &@
    Table[{{x, #}, {x, -#}} &@Sqrt[1 - x^2], {x, -1, 1, .1}]
  }]]

enter image description here

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Since I'm usually the one suggesting drawing from Graphics primitives I must vote for this. :-) –  Mr.Wizard May 26 '13 at 3:19
    
@halirutan +1 Very Nicely done! I too am curious what the colors slider will do. Is that hue angle? Thanks! –  R Hall May 26 '13 at 3:34
    
@Mr.Wizard The colorslider wasn't so spectacular as I excpected, so I removed it ;-) –  halirutan May 26 '13 at 11:17
    
@Mr.Wizard Then here per request the original color-slider-included version. –  halirutan May 26 '13 at 11:26

I set out to do this differently from R.M, but I ended up with something very similar. Nevertheless, I think there is a certain simplicity that results from my using ParametricPlot, so here it is:

ParametricPlot[
 r {Cos[t], Sin[t]}, {t, 0, 2 Pi}, {r, 0, 1},
 Axes -> False, Frame -> False,
 Mesh -> {47, 11, {0}, 8, 27, 27},
 MeshFunctions -> {#3 &, #3 &, #3 &, #4 &, # &, #2 &},
 MeshStyle -> ({#, #2, #2, #, #, #} &[Opacity[0.5], Thick]),
 ColorFunction -> (Hue[#3 - 1/12] &)
]

color wheel with a mesh

A complication that arose with this method is that I needed to specifically add the line at zero (that is, east), as I could not get Mesh to do this automatically.

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@MrWizard +1 for a cool solution! The hue angle is off a bit from the example though. Hue[#3 - (2 Pi/5.8)] will fix it. Thanks! –  R Hall May 26 '13 at 3:32
    
@R Hall, better to use Hue[#3 - 1/12], as rm suggested in his answer. That way, red exactly corresponds to $\pi/6$. –  J. M. May 26 '13 at 3:48
    
@J.M. yes of course you are correct. thanks! –  R Hall May 26 '13 at 4:31
    
@J.M. Thanks, I forgot what I was subtracting from and confused myself. Corrected. –  Mr.Wizard May 26 '13 at 17:12

Just for fun, only the color wheel drawing part done with Disk sectors:

With[{sectors = 360},
 angle = 2 Pi/sectors;
 Graphics[
  Table[{Hue[i/sectors], EdgeForm[{Thick, Hue[i/sectors]}],  
    Disk[{0, 0}, 1, {i angle, (i + 1) angle}]}, {i, 0, sectors - 1}]]]

I had to use a thick EdgeForm because without it I was getting a moiré pattern in the rendering.

color wheel

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Nice wheel, but the yellow must be at vertical. Thanks! –  R Hall May 26 '13 at 12:27
    
Just add a fixed offset to the angle calculation: With[{offset = Pi/6, sectors = 360}, angle = 2 Pi/sectors; Graphics[ Table[{Hue[i/sectors], EdgeForm[{Thick, Hue[i/sectors]}], Disk[{0, 0}, 1, {i angle + offset, (i + 1) angle + offset}]}, {i, 0, sectors - 1}]]] –  Aky May 26 '13 at 13:49
1  
+1 Unusual solution for the disk! –  R Hall May 26 '13 at 17:02
1  
Performance can be improved and the code simplified by turning off anti-aliasing and omitting EdgeForm: With[{sectors = 360}, angle = 2 Pi/sectors; Graphics[Table[{Antialiasing -> False, Hue[i/sectors - 1/12], Disk[{0, 0}, 1, {i angle, (i + 1) angle}]}, {i, 0, sectors - 1}]]] -- note also that the very center of the graphic is cleaner this way. –  Mr.Wizard May 26 '13 at 19:10
    
@Mr.Wizard Thanks for the tip. –  Aky May 26 '13 at 23:51

Here is another method based on RegionPlot[], similar to rm's solution. There are a few wrinkles in this version, however:

  1. I use PolarPlot[] to generate the ticks for me. (I know about the hidden functions behind the generation of the polar ticks, but I couldn't figure how to use them directly.)

  2. I use the saturation and brightness arguments of Hue[] to generate the meshes as part of the color function. The idea was stolen adapted from the solutions of Heike and Simon in this answer, but I did change a few things around.

Now, on to the routine:

hueWithMesh[x_, y_, hx_: 1/10, hr_: 1/8, ht_: 1/24, r1_: 2/5, r2_: 1/2, g_: 1/5] := 
  Block[{ph = Arg[x + I y]/π, s, b}, 
        s = r1 + (1 - r1) Abs[(Mod[2 Abs[x + I y]/hr, 2, 1] - 2) (Mod[ph/ht, 2, 1] - 2)]^g;
        b = r2 + (1 - r2) Abs[(Mod[2 x/hx, 2, 1] - 2) (Mod[2 y/hx, 2, 1] - 2)]^g;
        Hue[ph/2 - 1/12, s, Max[1 - s^2, b]]]

 Show[PolarPlot[1/Sqrt[2], {t, -π, π}, MaxRecursion -> 0, PlotPoints -> 6,
                PlotRange -> 1, PlotStyle -> None, PolarAxes -> Automatic], 
      RegionPlot[Abs[x + I y] <= 1, {x, -1, 1}, {y, -1, 1}, BoundaryStyle -> None, 
                 ColorFunction -> (hueWithMesh[#1, #2] &), ColorFunctionScaling -> False, 
                 Frame -> False, PlotPoints -> 200], PlotRange -> All]

a gridded color wheel

As you might notice from the implementation of hueWithMesh[], the parameters hr, ht, and hx all control the spacing in the rectangular and polar meshes, while r1, r2, and g all control the saturation/brightness for the meshes. You can tweak these parameters to your taste.

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+1 for extreme cool factor! I will have to go to school on this code. Thanks again for your help! –  R Hall May 27 '13 at 16:32
    
Thanks! This solution sure was fun to write. :) –  J. M. May 27 '13 at 17:08
    
Simon's answer is the first thing I thought about as well, when I saw the question, but I couldn't get the highlights working in time and couldn't be arsed to dig deeper :) –  rm -rf Jun 8 '13 at 16:30
    
@rm, at this juncture, I should confess that I had to stare at Simon's routines for a full hour before figuring how to take it apart for this question. –  J. M. Jun 8 '13 at 16:35
1  
Ok, I'm relieved then... If you had to spend an hour on it, I'm very certain that taking the lazy route was the best course of action for me =) –  rm -rf Jun 8 '13 at 16:37

Since you've already gotten a bunch of fine answers, I'll just quietly post this variation:

DensityPlot[ArcTan[x, y], {x, -1, 1}, {y, -1, 1}, 
            ColorFunction -> (Hue[# - 7/12] &), Frame -> False, Mesh -> {30, 30, 8, 49}, 
            MeshFunctions -> {#1 &, #2 &, Abs[#1 + I #2] &, Arg[#1 + I #2] &}, 
            MeshStyle -> {Opacity[1/3, GrayLevel[1/5]], Opacity[1/3, GrayLevel[1/5]],
                          Opacity[1/3, GrayLevel[1/2]], Opacity[1/3, GrayLevel[1/2]]},
            PlotPoints -> 45, RegionFunction -> (Norm[{#1, #2}] < 1 &)]

color wheel

Tick addition is left for as an exercise for less lazy readers.

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+1 for fractionalization. Very Elegant Solution! Thanks! –  R Hall May 26 '13 at 17:00
1  
(I've got another variation in the works, but I'll post it much later.) –  J. M. May 26 '13 at 18:15

Using Polygon:

With[{d = 2 Pi/360}, 
 Graphics[Table[{Hue[t/( 2 Pi)], EdgeForm@Hue[t/( 2 Pi)], 
    Polygon@{{0, 0}, {Cos[t], Sin[t]}, {Cos[t + d], Sin[t + d]}}}, {t, d, 2 Pi, d}]]
 ]
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