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Say in Documentation Center -> ImageData -> EXAMPLES ->
Basic Examples you find an image of a planetary body (Mars?).

Can one obtain the file source for this image wich is copied
into a Mathematica line? The image is originated for shure in
Mathematicas images samples somewhere in its folders.
What I mean however is to get the info rigth from the picture
in that Notebook.

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What happens if you choose the Cell > Show Expression menu item with your cursor in the cell? I think it shows that the image is coded into the notebook but I might be wrong... –  cormullion May 25 '13 at 9:31
2  
As cormullion notes, the image is itself embedded into the notebook. If you use InputForm[] to peer at it, you'll see it's an Image[] object. –  J. M. May 25 '13 at 9:52
    
(It could be this photo of Mars, by the way.) –  cormullion May 25 '13 at 10:09

1 Answer 1

The image "container" or object has several pieces of metadata about the image and its encoding, as well as the image data (i.e., the values that define the pixels) itself. You can see what this data is using

InputForm[img]

where img is your image. For the Mars picture of the question

enter image description here

this gives:

Image[RawArray["Byte", {{{221, 139, 66}, {217, 135, 64} ....
   .... {0, 0, 0}, {0, 0, 0}, {0, 0, 0}}}], "Byte", ColorSpace -> "RGB", 
        ImageSize -> All, Interleaving -> True]

so you can see that the meta data is limited to Byte type (binary, grayscale, etc) ColorSpace (RGB, HSB, etc), ImageSize, and InterLeaving. There is no place to store an address for the source of the image.

This image of Mars does not seem to be part of the Wolfram curated data, as it is not part of either ExampleData["TestImage"] or ExampleData["AerialImage"]. If you do a google image search on this image, here are the images google thinks are most similar:

enter image description here

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Love the last 'similar image'! –  cormullion May 25 '13 at 10:29
    
TinEye seems to give more results related to the given image. –  J. M. May 25 '13 at 10:50

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