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When presenting a technical derivation within a Section of a Mathematica notbook, I often encounter the situation where a lot of "detail" separates equations (x) and (x+1), and I suspect many readers would prefer not to see this detail. I could use a collapsible subsection to hold the required material, but at the end of the subsection I would have to create a new Section to continue the main flow of the document. I find this to be stylistically awkward.

Have any of the wizards solved this sort of problem? Perhaps by developing a Style for a special section that can be collapsed or expanded in a standalone manner that doesn't interrupt the flow of the main document?

Thanks, Tom

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Not ideal but you could manually group the cells and then close the group. So maybe create a text cell above these cells that reads "additional information" and group the text cell with the cells you want to hide. This way you do not need to create any section or subsection cells. –  Mike Honeychurch Dec 27 '12 at 22:22
    
I think this question would receive more attention if you could better illustrate what you mean and desire. For now: are you aware of Cell > Cell Properties > Open ? –  Mr.Wizard Dec 29 '12 at 19:30

1 Answer 1

As Mike Honeychurch mentioned in comments:

Not ideal but you could manually group the cells and then close the group. So maybe create a text cell above these cells that reads "additional information" and group the text cell with the cells you want to hide. This way you do not need to create any section or subsection cells.

Cells:

Mathematica graphics

Add text:

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Group (right-mouse or Cell menu):

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Double click group bracket:

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Mr.Wizard's suggestion:

Use Cell > Cell Properties > Open

Mathematica graphics

Removing the check mark next to Open gets you this:

Mathematica graphics

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