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All the examples I am seeing on internet are related to normal functions that carry out loops and assignments but I have not seen one example where I can see a graphics based program being debugged. can someone who has used debugging extensively shed some light on this please?

Edit: I meant to say that like in Manipulate, I can see the graphics dynamically, in the same way suppose I have completed a loop once than can I see the update in graphics successively or I will have to wait for the final values to arrive. In a way can I debug programs that include Graphics or Graphics3d in them?

And thanks for such warm welcome. :)

Example:

fun[x_]:= Graphics[... parameters]

So, can I step into this Graphics inbuilt function?

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Welcome to Mathematica.SE! Please read the FAQs to get an idea how this site works. At the moment, your question is rather unclear. Does it have to do with Mathematica? If so, please give us more context. –  Yves Klett Oct 25 '12 at 6:18
    
AFAIK, it is not possible to debug the rendering sequence of a Graphicsexpression. Is that what you want to do? Can you supply an actual expression you´d like to debug. –  Yves Klett Oct 25 '12 at 8:07
    
Hard to tell, but maybe Rojo's answer here is related: performance profiling Dynamics. It tells you how to debug a dynamically updated graphical user interface with lots of graphics. –  István Zachar Oct 25 '12 at 9:18
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I´ll be happy to withdraw this answer if someone comes up with a more informed one, since essentially (as far as I know) the answer is no.

You cannot step into Graphics or Graphics3D or Show expressions (in the sense of debugging the rendering sequence itself) with the debugger, since these expressions are sent by the kernel to the frontend wholesale for rendering, and you probably can only debug the part that is happening in the kernel.

Perhaps if you can come up with an actual piece of code you´d like to debug or watch progressively, there may be other ways to achieve such a goal.

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