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I wish to numerically solve the following PDE. Although there are some complete discussions for solving PDEs in tutorial/NDSolvePDE, there is no hint for the nonlinear case by discretization. Thus, I will be thankful to receive some helps on the following NPDE where $x \in [0,1]$, $t \in [0,2]$,

The equation is

$$\frac{\partial u(x,t)}{\partial t}+u(x,t) \frac{\partial u(x,t)}{\partial x}=c \frac{\partial ^2u(x,t)}{\partial x^2}$$

with initial condition

$$u(x,0)=\frac{2 \pi \beta c \sin (\pi x)}{\alpha +\beta \cos (\pi x)}$$

and boundary conditions

$$u(0,t)=u(1,t)=0$$

I tried the backward finite difference (FD) for $\frac{\partial u(x,t)}{\partial t}$ and the central FD for the others. I wrote the following code, but I think there are some gaps in it. Because, the approximate solutions do not match the exact one

$$u(x,t)=\frac{2 \pi \beta c e^{-c \pi ^2 t} \sin (\pi x)}{\alpha +\beta e^{-c \pi ^2 t} \cos (\pi x)}$$

Note that Subscript[w, i, j] stands for the approximation in the grid point $(x_i,t_j)$.

M = 8; NN = 8; m = M - 1; 
n = NN - 1; alpha = 5.; 
beta = 4.; c = 0.05; 
T = 2.; h = (1. - 0.)/M; 
k =T/NN;

(*Defining the Grid points*)
Table[Subscript[x, i] = 0 + i h, {i, 0, M}]; 
Table[Subscript[t, j] = 0 + j k, {j, 0, NN}];

(*Defining the Initial Conditions*)
For[i = 1, i <= m, i++, 
  Subscript[w, i, 0] = (2. c beta Pi Sin[Pi Subscript[x, i]])
                     / (alpha + beta Cos[Pi Subscript[x, i]])
];

(*Defining the Boundary Conditions*)
For[j = 1, j <= n, j++, 
  Subscript[w, 0, j] = 0
]; 
For[j = 1, j <= n, j++, 
  Subscript[w, 1, j] = 0
];

(*Defining the nonlinear equations due to discretization*)
For[i = 1, i <= m, i++,
  {
   For[j = 1, j <= n, j++,
     f[i, j] = Subscript[w, i, j] 
       + (k/(2 h)) Subscript[w, i, j] (Subscript[w, i + 1, j] - Subscript[w, i - 1, j]) 
       - (c k/(h^2)) (Subscript[w, i + 1, j] - 2 Subscript[w, i, j] 
                      + Subscript[w, i - 1, j]) 
       - Subscript[w,i, j - 1]
   ]
  }
];

F = Flatten[Table[f[i, j], {i, 1, m}, {j, 1, n}]]; 
Dimensions[F];
F // MatrixForm;
Vec = Flatten[Table[Subscript[w, i, j], {i, 2, M}, {j, 1, n}]];

(*Finding the solutions*)
Sol = Part[NSolve[F, Vec, Reals], 1]

Any suggestion is appreciated. In fact, what would be the final nonlinear system of equations resulting of discretization?

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4  
Would you format your code, please? –  rcollyer Sep 11 '12 at 13:11
4  
Your question is unreadable. Would you please consider to read the FAQ of this site first? Furthermore, please see here how you can format your question properly: mark code, use LaTeX, etc.. –  halirutan Sep 11 '12 at 13:35
    
I revised the question, now please give some comments. –  Fazlollah Soleymani Sep 11 '12 at 14:47
    
In fact, it should be the nonlinear burgers equations. –  Fazlollah Soleymani Sep 11 '12 at 18:30
    
@NasserM.Abbasi I test the PDE by plugging in the exact solution, it turns out to be correct. And, I don't know much about the discretization, but, can backfoward FD together with central FD solve it? If so, to get u[i,j], we need u[i-1,j], u[i+1, j], u[i,j-1]: at least one unknown value is left, causing an endless loop. (It may stops for some unexpected assignments, which I think have happened in your and PlatoManiac's code, see my comment under PlatoManiac's answer for more details. ) BTW, if you just want to numerically solve it, NDSolve is enough. –  xzczd Oct 4 '12 at 6:17

2 Answers 2

These days I've picked up some knowledge about finite difference method and now I'm able to fix OP's code :D.

Well, before beginning, it should be mentioned that, it's better to avoid For and Subscript in Mathematica, but I'd rather not talk about them in this answer since these have been discussed a lot in this site, what's more, they're not the root of the "gap" in OP's code. To fix the code, there're two major issues:

1. Something is wrong with the indices of the grid points

In the following part of the code, you lose 4 grid points and mix up the indices of the grid points and the real coordinates when defining IC and BC:

(*Defining the Initial Conditions*) 
For[i = 1, i <= m, i++, 
    Subscript[w, i, 0] = 
        (2. c beta Pi Sin[Pi Subscript[x, i]])/(alpha + beta Cos[Pi Subscript[x, i]])];
(*Defining the Boundary Conditions*) 

For[j = 1, j <= n, j++, Subscript[w, 0, j] = 0]

For[j = 1, j <= n, j++, Subscript[w, 1, j] = 0]

You've divided the domain into 8*8 equal parts, so just as the following graph illustrates:

enter image description here

j is actually from 0 to NN:

For[j = 0, j <= NN, j++, Subscript[w, 0, j] = 0]
For[j = 0, j <= NN, j++, Subscript[w, M(* Notice here! *), j] = 0]

Similar mistakes lie in the definition of f[i, j] and F and Vec:

For[i = 1, i <= m, i++, {For[j = 1, j <= n, j++, f[i, j] = Subscript[w, i, j] + (k/(2 h)) Subscript[w, i, j] (Subscript[w, i + 1, j] - Subscript[w, i - 1, j]) - (c k/(h^2)) (Subscript[w, i + 1, j] - 2 Subscript[w, i, j] + Subscript[w, i - 1, j]) - Subscript[w, i, j - 1]]}];

The j <= n should be j <= NN:

For[i = 1, i <= m, 
  i++, {For[j = 1, j <= NN, j++, 
    f[i, j] = 
     Subscript[w, i, 
       j] + (k/(2 h)) Subscript[w, i, 
        j] (Subscript[w, i + 1, j] - 
         Subscript[w, i - 1, j]) - (c k/(h^2)) (Subscript[w, i + 1, 
          j] - 2 Subscript[w, i, j] + Subscript[w, i - 1, j]) - 
      Subscript[w, i, j - 1]]}];

F = Flatten[Table[f[i, j], {i, 1, m}, {j, 1, n}]];

Vec = Flatten[Table[Subscript[w, i, j], {i, 2, M}, {j, 1, n}]];

Fixed version:

F = Flatten[Table[f[i, j], {i, m}, {j, NN}]];
Vec = Flatten[Table[Subscript[w, i, j], {i, m}, {j, NN}]];

2. How to solve the set of equations faster

Once we finish the modifications above, we can get the correct solution in principle, while the real trouble starts in fact… as mentioned in the comments above, the result of using backward finite difference together with central finite difference is, we need $w_{i-1,j}, w_{i+1,j}, w_{i,j-1}$ to get $w_{i,j}$ i.e. there are always 2 or more than 2 unknown variables in the difference formula, as shown in the GIF below:

enter image description here

Green points for the knowns, red points for the unknowns and gray arrows for the difference formula, no matter where you put the three arrows, there're 2 or more than 2 unknown points.

So "simple" iteration(as PlatoManiac has tried in his answer) won't work in this case because it causes endless loop. (for example, to get $w_{1,1}$, Mathematica calls $w_{0,1}, w_{2,1}, w_{1,0}$, but $w_{2,1}$ is unknown, so Mathematica goes on calling $w_{1,1}, w_{3,1}, w_{2,0}$: $w_{1,1}$ is called again! Then it never finishes… )

Of course, all these equations form a closed equation groups, it can be solved theoretically, and that's what you've tried in your code, but solving this set of equations (for your case you need to solve 56 interrelated quadratic equations…) with Solve or NSolve is extremely slow. (Your original code is fast because of the mistakes I mentioned above… )

We need a work-around.

One choice is to use FindRoot instead, though FindRoot often disappoints me, it really works well for your equation:

Sol = FindRoot[F, {#, 1} & /@ Vec];
Table[Subscript[w, i, j], {i, 0, M}, {j, 0, NN}] /. Sol;
solFD = ListInterpolation[%, {{0, 1}, {0, 2}}];
Plot3D[solFD[x, t], {x, 0, 1}, {t, 0, 2}]

enter image description here

Let's compare it to the analytical solution:

α = 5.; β = 4.; c = 0.05;
u[x_, t_] := (2 β c Pi Exp[-c Pi^2 t] Sin[Pi x])/(α + β Exp[-c Pi^2 t] Cos[Pi x]);
Plot3D[solFD[x, t] - u[x, t], {x, 0, 1}, {t, 0, 2}]

enter image description here

Hmm… not bad, considering the sparse grid. By the way, if we increase M and N, for example, to:

M = 25; NN = 25;

The error will decrease to:

enter image description here

Another approach is to use the classic relaxation method, to make the implementation of the algorithm conciser, I'd like to have some big changes on your original code.

First, we need to acquire the initial guess of the solution, A better guess can improve the speed of convergence, but here I simply choose IC just for convenience:

m = 25; n = 25;
α = 5.; β = 4.; c = 0.05;
x1 = 0.; x2 = 1.; t1 = 0.; t2 = 2.;
dx = (x2 - x1)/m;
dt = (t2 - t1)/n;
int = Table[(2 β c Pi Sin[Pi i dx])/(α + β Cos[Pi i dx]), {i, 0, m}, {j, 0, n}];
ListPlot3D[int\[Transpose]]

The initial guess:

enter image description here

Also, the explicit expression of difference formula is necessary, here I define it as a function:

mid[u_, i_, j_] = 
  Quiet[u[[i, j]] /. 
    First@Solve[
      u[[i, j]] + (dt/(2 dx)) u[[i, j]] (u[[i + 1, j]] - 
           u[[i - 1, j]]) - (c dt/(dx^2)) (u[[i + 1, j]] - 
           2 u[[i, j]] + u[[i - 1, j]]) - u[[i, j - 1]] == 0, u[[i, j]]]];

OK, let's iterate!:

list = FixedPoint[
    Table[If[i == 0 || i == m || j == 0, #[[i + 1, j + 1]], 
       mid[#, i + 1, j + 1]], {i, 0, m}, {j, 0, n}] &, int, 
    SameTest -> (Max[Abs[#2 - #1]] < 0.0001 &)]; // AbsoluteTiming
{2.5216000, Null}

Remark: Though not that important in this problem, using the experience got in this and this post, we can speed up the iteration:

iter = ReleaseHold[
    Hold@Compile[{{int, _Real, 2}}, 
        Module[{d = Dimensions@int}, 
         FixedPoint[
          Table[If[i == 1 || i == d[[1]] || j == 1, #[[i, j]], 
             mid[#, i, j]], {i, d[[1]]}, {j, d[[2]]}] &, int, 
          SameTest -> (Max[Abs[#2 - #1]] < 0.0001 &)]], 
        CompilationTarget -> "C", RuntimeOptions -> "Speed"] /. 
      DownValues@mid /. Part -> Compile`GetElement]; 

list = iter@int; // AbsoluteTiming
{0.0030000, Null}

Remember to take away the CompilationTarget -> "C", if you don't have a C compiler installed, and notice that iter can actually accept any initial guess.

Here's the result:

solRe = ListInterpolation[list, {{0, 1}, {0, 2}}];
Plot3D[solRe[x, t], {x, 0, 1}, {t, 0, 2}, ColorFunction->"Rainbow", PlotStyle->Opacity[2/3]]

enter image description here

Error check:

u[x_, t_] := (2 β c Pi Exp[-c Pi^2 t] Sin[Pi x])/(α + β Exp[-c Pi^2 t] Cos[Pi x]);
Plot3D[solRe[x, t] - u[x, t], {x, 0, 1}, {t, 0, 2}, PlotRange -> All]

enter image description here

Finally, we understand how cute our NDSolve is:

Clear[u, v]
a = 5; b = 4; c = 1/20;
t1 = 0; t2 = 2; x1 = 0; x2 = 1;

sol = NDSolve[{D[u[x, t], t] + u[x, t] D[u[x, t], x] == c D[u[x, t], x, x], 
               u[x, 0] == (2 b c Pi Sin[Pi x])/(a + b Cos[Pi x]), 
               u[0, t] == u[1, t] == 0}, u, {x, x1, x2}, {t, t1, t2}];

Plot3D[u[x, t] /. sol, {x, x1, x2}, {t, t1, t2}, ColorFunction -> "TemperatureMap"]

v[x_, t_] := (2 c b Pi Exp[-c Pi^2 t] Sin[Pi x])/(a + b Exp[-c Pi^2 t] Cos[Pi x]);
Plot3D[(u[x, t] /. sol) - v[x, t], {x, x1, x2}, {t, t1, t2}, 
       ColorFunction -> "TemperatureMap"]

enter image description hereenter image description here

share|improve this answer

A quick answer now. I will come back to this once I have more time. First we use the common finite difference operators to discretize PDE.

Symbolics:

Clear[u];
RFSDiscrit[eq_] := 
Module[{mid},
       mid = Distribute@FullSimplify@ExpandAll[(
        eq /.{
          u[x, t] -> u[i, n],
          D[u[x, t], t] -> (u[i, n] - u[i, n - 1])/\[CapitalDelta]t,
          D[u[x, t], x, x] ->
          (u[i + 1, n - 1] - 2 u[i, n - 1] + u[i - 1, n - 1])/\[CapitalDelta]x^2
             }
        )];
       (First@Solve[mid == 0, u[i, n]])[[All, 2]] // First
       ];

Recursion:

Lets generate the recursive formula for the main equation.

exp = RFSDiscrit[D[u[x, t], t] + (c - u[x, t]) D[u[x, t], x, x]]

enter image description here

Now comes the rest of the recursion definition part.

alpha = 5.;
beta = 4.;
c = .05;
(*Use recursive formula*)
u[i_, n_] := u[i, n] = exp;
u[0, n_] := u1[t] /. t -> n \[CapitalDelta]t;
(*Number of discretization points for [0,L]*)
spacediscrit = 100; 
u[spacediscrit, n_] := u2[t] /. t -> n \[CapitalDelta]t;
u[i_, 0] := u0[x] /. x -> i \[CapitalDelta]x;
(* End of spatial boundary*)
L = 1;
timesteps = 1000;
\[CapitalDelta]t = 2/timesteps;
\[CapitalDelta]x = L/spacediscrit;
(*Initial Condition*)
u0[x_] = (2. c beta Pi Sin[Pi x])/(alpha + beta Cos[Pi x]);
(*Boundary Condition*)
u1[t_] = 0;
u2[t_] = 0;
(* Time snapshots for u(x,t_n)*)
pics = Table[ListPlot[Table[{\[CapitalDelta]x i, u[i, n]},{i, 0, spacediscrit}], 
            InterpolationOrder -> 3, Joined -> True, Mesh -> 10, 
            MeshStyle -> Red, Filling -> Axis, FillingStyle -> LightPink, 
            Frame -> True, PlotRange -> All, Axes -> None, 
            PlotLabel ->TraditionalForm[
             "u(x,t) at t=" <>ToString[\[CapitalDelta]t n // N]]
             ], 
            {n, 0, timesteps,30}];

enter image description here

Good/Bad-ness of...!

Now we can get $u(x,t)$ as a continuous function as follows.

dat = Table[Table[N@{\[CapitalDelta]x j, \[CapitalDelta]t n, u[j, n]}, 
            {j, 0,spacediscrit}],
      {n, 0, timesteps}];
fun = Interpolation[Flatten[dat, 1]]

InterpolatingFunction[{{0.,1.},{0.,2.}},<>]

Now a nice plot to celebrate the nasty numerical instability of the above equation on the given parameter setting. enter image description here

The MMA function NDSolve FiniteDifferenceDerivative can also be used for discretization.

share|improve this answer
    
Whee, poles... :D –  J. M. Sep 12 '12 at 2:54
    
You solved Subscript[u, t] + u Subscript[u, xx] = c Subscript[u, xx]. Please consider solving the following NPDE instead: Subscript[u, t] + u Subscript[u, x] = c Subscript[u, xx]. –  Fazlollah Soleymani Sep 12 '12 at 7:25
    
Sorry, I have to cast my first downvote…This solution is wrong. It just gives me the warning message $RecursionLimit::reclim.I set some effort in correcting the mistake but sadly I failed, the only thing I know is that the definition of u[i,n] is incorrect.(See here for more details.) And, even with the solution in the link I give, the code won't work, I guess the reason is the recursion in this case is quite complex and it doesn't work as our expect. –  xzczd Oct 3 '12 at 12:38

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